Why doesn't anyone ever overpay Bob Howry?

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Bob Howry is apparently one of the most underrated or at least unluckiest relievers in baseball, because for the second straight offseason he’s managed only a one-year deal for modest money while inferior relievers get multi-year pacts for several times as much.
Brandon Lyon got $15 million over three years from the Astros. Fernando Rodney got $11 million over two years from the Angels. LaTroy Hawkins got $7.5 million over two years from the Brewers. John Grabow got $7.5 million over two years from the Cubs. Yet over the weekend Howry inked a one-year, $3 million contract with the Diamondbacks after playing last season on a one-year, $2.75 million deal with the Giants.
During the past half-dozen seasons Howry has had an ERA above 3.39 once, and in the other five years posted marks of 2.47, 2.74, 3.17, 3.32, and 3.39. He’s also been very durable, making 79, 84, 78, 72, and 63 appearances in the past five seasons. Among all active relievers with at least 500 appearances Howry’s adjusted ERA+ of 125 ranks 10th, and in the past six seasons only Mariano Rivera, Joe Nathan, Francisco Rodriguez, Francisco Cordero, Scot Shields, Chad Qualls, and Scott Linebrink have logged as many innings with a better ERA+.
Howry is 36 years old, next season will be his 13th in the big leagues, and he’s had a below-average ERA twice, yet after signing a one-year deal with the Diamondbacks he’s earned around $22 million for his entire career. Not bad money, obviously, but Lyon was just handed $15 million for three years and Danys Baez just finished a three-year, $19 million deal. Sometimes it seems like general managers randomly decide which relievers to overpay, and for whatever reason that dart has never really landed on Howry.

Video: Starling Marte refuses to take first base after being hit by pitch

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Pirates outfielder Starling Marte was hit on the hand by a Jack Flaherty pitch in the fourth inning of Tuesday night’s game against the Cardinals. Rather than take first base, Marte — who came to the plate with a runner on first base — insisted to home plate umpire Bruce Dreckman that the ball hit the knob of the bat, not his hand. Marte was allowed to continue his at-bat, though manager Clint Hurdle came out to discuss the ruling with Dreckman. Marte eventually grounded into a fielder’s choice. He then got caught attempting to steal second base and the Pirates scored zero runs in the inning.

According to Baseball Prospectus, a team that has runners on first and second with no outs is expected to score 1.55 runs. Having a runner on first base with one out yields 0.56 expected runs. Marte essentially cost his team a run by rejecting first base. Oops.