Who will the Yankees get to play left field?

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On the surface trading Melky Cabrera for Javier Vazquez clears the way for Johnny Damon to re-sign with the Yankees, but Joel Sherman of the New York Post reports that they still view him as “too expensive” after last week’s back-and-forth with agent Scott Boras. Sherman also notes that parting with Cabrera probably doesn’t make the Yankees any more likely to end up with Jason Bay or Matt Holliday.
So if Damon, Bay, and Holliday still aren’t likely options, who might the Yankees be targeting to play left field? Mark Feinsand of the New York Daily News names Mark DeRosa as “the most likely candidate,” noting that he could start in left field while also providing some infield depth behind Alex Rodriguez at third base. According to Feinsand the Yankees “have roughly $5-6 million to spend on left field.”
DeRosa was initially said to be seeking a three-year deal for quite a bit more than that to begin the offseason, but recently there have been reports of his asking price coming down and the Yankees were actually linked to him several weeks ago despite having no obvious place for him to play at the time. DeRosa hit just .250/.319/.433 in 2009 while battling a wrist injury, but his .291/.368/.453 line from the previous three seasons would be solidly above average in left field.

Kyle Seager is in The Best Shape of His Life

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Kyle Seager had the worst year of his big league career in 2018. He hit .221/.273/.400 (86 OPS+) and saw his home run total decline for the second straight year. In response, Seager has reported back to camp in Peoria . . . in the best shape of his life.

This story about it in the Seattle Times has it all: the poor production and nagging injuries that led to a change of habits in the offseason. A new diet, new exercise routines, a focus on flexibility, the epiphany that an injury was the result of conditioning and, as the payoff, the scene on the first day of workouts when his uniform was too baggy and he had to get a new one.

The proof, of course, will not come from the eating, but in the production.