A's close to deal with Coco Crisp

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According to Buster Olney of ESPN.com, the Athletics are close to signing free agent outfielder Coco Crisp to a one-year contract worth between $4.5 million-5 million.
The Padres also expressed interest in the 30-year-old outfielder, but
Crisp elected to join Oakland’s crowded outfield, instead. I’m guessing
it’s for the contract security, which also reportedly includes an
option for 2011.




Crisp batted .228/.336/.378 with
three home runs, 14 RBI, 14 stolen bases and 30 runs scored in 49 games
for the Royals in ’09 before undergoing season-ending rotator cuff
surgery on both shoulders. He is expected to be ready in time for
spring training. Crisp is a .277/.331/.407 career hitter over eight
major league seasons.




It’s a pretty odd move by general
manager Billy Beane with Rajai Davis coming off a tremendous second
half and with plenty of quality outfielders already in the
organization. Crisp hasn’t played a single game outside center field
since 2005, so now Davis will likely move to a corner spot, with Scott
Hairston and Ryan Sweeney filling in around them.




Beane had talked about prospect Chris Carter playing some outfield,
but he may find himself back at first base after the signing of Crisp.
Don’t forget that the Athletics also traded Brett Wallace to the Blue
Jays in exchange for prospect outfielder Michael Taylor last week.
Taylor, 24, batted .282/.359/.491 with five home runs and 19 RBI in 128
at-bats at the Triple-A level last season and isn’t that far from making a splash
on the major league level. He’s almost surely destined to be a corner
outfielder, but hopefully Beane won’t block his progress.

He gone! Hawk Harrelson called his last game yesterday

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Ken Harrelson has been broadcasting for decades but yesterday was his last one. As of today the Hawk has hung up his mic and entered retirement. He gone!

Harrelson, 77, who played in the majors for nine seasons with the A’s, Red Sox, Indians and Senators and led the AL in RBI in 1968. He was also the White Sox’ general manager for a single season in the mid-80s. That didn’t go well — he famously fired Tony La Russa and Dave Dombrowski and traded away a young Bobby Bonilla, but his career as a broadcaster went swimmingly.

Harrelson served as a Red Sox broadcaster from 1975 through 1981. Despite his reputation as an unrepentant homer for his White Sox — who he called “the good guys,” as opposed to the “bad guys” playing them — he was actually fired as a Red Sox broadcaster for being critical of ownership. He then embarked on his first stint with the White Sox before his move into the front office, worked as a Yankees broadcaster from 1987-88 and worked games for NBC’s Game of the Week in the mid-1980s as well. He then returned to call games for the White Sox in 1990 and the rest is history.

Hawk will still be a team ambassador for Chicago so he not totally gone, but the White Sox broadcast booth is entering a new era.