UPDATE: Matt Holliday is not going to Baltimore

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This morning we passed along word that the Orioles are getting into the Matt Holliday bidding.  If they are, they’re doing it kind of like how I write in insanely low bids at silent auctions in the almost non-existent chance that I’ll get, say, an autographed team photo of the 1969 Seattle Pilots for ten bucks. In other words, with absolutely no hope of success:

The Orioles, according to sources, did have some discussions about
Holliday with agent Scott Boras during their negotiations regarding
Gonzalez. Any team would be interested in such a player, especially a
club with a glaring need for a right-handed power hitter. However, the
Orioles are quite realistic about their chances of landing Holliday.
And privately, they have no expectations whatsoever that Holliday will
be with the team next year.

Sorry O’s fans. But hey, at least it’s fun to say that your team is in on the action, right? It isn’t? Oh, well, sorry. Enjoy having Mike Gonzalez close for about three months until his arm falls off or something.

Brewers promote David Stearns from GM to president of baseball operations

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It used to be that the top dog in a team’s baseball operations department was the general manager. That has changed over the past several years with some combination of title inflation, a genuine addition of supervisory layers and, on some level, employe poaching insurance leading to the top dog now being called, usually, a “president of baseball operations.”

Brewers’ general manager David Stearns is the latest to assume that tile, as the club just announced that he has been promoted to Milwaukee’s president of baseball operations. He has also received a contract extension of unknown length.

Not a big shock given how well the Brewers did in 2018, winning the NL Central title and playing in the NLCS. It’s also worth noting — with a nod to that “employee poaching insurance” item above — that Stearns has drawn some interest from other organizations. It’s thus not unfair to see the promotion is both a thanks for a job well done and a means of keeping other teams’ hands off of him, as employees are generally not given permission to interview for lateral moves, but are given permission to interview for promotions.

The Mudville Nine may have wanted to steal him from Milwaukee, but for Stearns to get a promotion from where he is now would require the creation of some other lofty title.