Bud's Committee is not going to ban the DH

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I went on yesterday about how Commissioner Selig’s little committee was probably set up for cynical purposes. Today the Chicago Tribune’s Phil Rogers goes in a different direction, hatching the conspiracy theory that the committee was set up to ban the Designated Hitter:

To
be fair, it’s premature to ask such a potentially provocative question.
But thanks to Commissioner Bud Selig’s decision to turn recommendations
for on-field matters over to a newly created version of the NFL’s Competition Committee, the DH rule could face its first real threat since the American League accepted it permanently for the 1976 season . . . The commissioner did not mention the DH rule, but Cardinals manager
Tony La Russa and longtime Braves executive John Schuerholz, who joined
Selig on a conference call, both listed it as the one thing they
potentially would change if they could.

I’m no fan of the DH, so if there was even a shred of a scintilla of a hope that La Russa and the gang were going to recommend its abolition, I’d be playing it up like crazy. But there’s nothing here to suggest that the committee is even going to look at the DH rule, let alone opine on it.

La Russa doesn’t like it. Great. But that “if they could” in the last sentence of the blockquote is pretty important. Messing with rules is one thing. Abolishing the DH, however, messes with rosters. As in, the position on the AL roster that has historically had the highest average salary in baseball and is home to a lot of players who would otherwise be out of the league due to their inability to play defense. The Player’s Union would no sooner agree to getting rid of the DH than the Teamster’s Union would agree to give up seniority pay.

The DH made its debut three months before I was born. I’ve resigned myself to the DH. I’ve even prepared myself for the expansion of the DH to the NL one day, because I think that has pretty even odds of happening in my lifetime. Getting rid of it? No way. No how. The world simply isn’t that just.

Report: Padres have discussed trading Wil Myers for Mariners’ Jean Segura and Mike Leake

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Ken Rosenthal of The Athletic reports that the Padres have discussed with the Mariners a potential trade in which outfielder Wil Myers would head to Seattle in exchange for shortstop Jean Segura and starter Mike Leake. Leake would need to waive his no-trade clause in order to make the deal work.

Myers has four years and $64 million remaining on his contract with a $20 million club option for 2023 as well. Segura has four years and $58 million remaining with a $17 million club option for 2023. Leake is under contract for two more years with $36 million remaining as well as an $18 million mutual option for 2021.

This past season, Myers battled elbow, oblique, and foot injuries last season, limiting him to 83 games and 343 plate appearances. He hit .253/.318/.446 with 11 home runs, 39 RBI, 39 runs scored, and 13 stolen bases. Myers played all over the field for the Padres, spending time at third base and both outfield corners as well as first base and a brief inning in center. If Myers were to go to Seattle, he would likely handle first base on a full-time basis.

2018 marked an All-Star campaign for Segura, who hit .304/.341/.415 with 10 home runs, 63 RBI, 91 runs scored, and 20 stolen bases in 632 plate appearances. Baseball Reference tallies him at 13 WAR over the last three seasons, so he would certainly be an impact player for the Padres. Rosenthal suggests Segura could handle shortstop for the Padres until top prospect Fernando Tatis, Jr. is ready. Segura would then move to second base. Alternatively, Tatis could potentially move to third base.

Leake, 31, is essentially a throw-in player in the deal. This past season, the right-hander put up middling numbers, finishing 10-10 with a 4.36 ERA and a 119/34 K/BB ratio in 185 2/3 innings. He would have no problem slotting into the Padres’ rotation.

Rosenthal takes care to point out that this suggested deal is not believed to be close, but it is notable that such a swap is being considered. On Monday, the Mariners traded starter James Paxton to the Yankees. The Mariners are believed to be setting their sights further down the line to be competitive. It could become a full-blown rebuilding effort. It’s a shame because the Mariners had a solid 2018, finishing 89-73, but they finished 14 games behind the Astros and were even eight games behind the second-place Athletics. The way front offices approach competing these days, finishing above .500 but out of the postseason isn’t good enough.