Aroldis Chapman's old agents sue his new ones

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That little workout in Houston wasn’t the only thing happening in Aroldis Chapman land yesterday. The other thing: Athletes Premier International and Edwin Mejia — his original agents —  sued his new agents, Hendricks Sports Management, claiming that they illegally lured him away after API and Mejia went through all the trouble of helping Chapman defect and setting up residency in Andorra and all of that.

For you lawyers out there, the claims are (1) tortious interference with a contract; (2) tortious interference with business relations; and (3) unjust enrichment.  For you non-lawyers out there, it amounts to a claim Hendricks gave Chapman a big song and dance, talked smack about the old agents, and dangled some unholy combination of lies and shiny things in front of his eyes in order to get him to sign on with team Hendricks, and now stand to unfairly profit from the giant bonus their client is about to receive. A copy of the lawsuit can be found here.

Players are allowed to switch agents if they want, but let’s be clear: there’s all kinds of ugliness in these sorts of relationships. If you want an education about this stuff, read Jerry Crasnick’s excellent book about agents, which gives some pretty good insight about how agents steal clients from one another all the time. It takes a pair of brass ones to make it in that racket.

Obviously this suit isn’t about wanting Chapman back. It’s about wanting a cut of the $15 million+ that Chapman is going to get from one of the teams who watched him down in Houston yesterday. Whether the plaintiffs get any of that depends on whether the change of representation in this case was the usual unseemly affair, or an unseemly affair with a gloss of illegality sprinkled on top.

Report: Angels to sign Cody Allen

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Ken Rosenthal of The Athletic reports that the Angels and reliever Cody Allen are in agreement on a one-year contract, pending a physical. The value of the contract is not yet known.

Allen, 30, was looking for an opportunity to close and the Angels can certainly provide that. He will likely be the favorite to break camp as the closer. 2018 was the roughest year of his career, however, as he finished with a 4.70 ERA, 27 saves, and a 80/33 K/BB ratio in 67 innings. Among Allen’s six full seasons, his 27.7 strikeout rate and 11.4 percent walk rate represented career-worsts. FanGraphs also shows him losing nearly a full MPH on his average fastball velocity.

The Angels lost closer Keynan Middleton to Tommy John surgery early last season and he likely won’t return until the second half of the 2019 season. Blake Parker, who handled save situations in Middleton’s place, was non-tendered by the Angels in November and ended up signing with the Twins. The closer’s role is Allen’s to lose, it seems.