Sorry, Houston fans: Wade, Justice share same brain

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Each time I start to wonder why I still have the Houston Chronicle’s Richard Justice on my RSS reader, he produces a gem like this:

Here’s my five-minute analysis of the $4.5-million signing of Pedro Feliz. I haven’t spoken to GM Ed Wade. In other words, I’m thinking for myself. Run for your lives!
I believe Chris Johnson will still be given every opportunity to win the third-base position this spring. Remember that he was so highly regarded last spring that the Astros figured he’d spend a few weeks at Round Rock, then become the everyday third baseman.

Actually, I do remember the terribly misguided belief that Johnson was nearly ready to take over at third base. Then he went on to hit a thoroughly unexceptional .281/.323/.461 with 13 homers in 384 at-bats in the PCL.
And one of the very important things to remember here is that Johnson’s bat is the strongest part of his game. He lacks range at third base, and he offers nothing on the basepaths.
But one can still be sane and believe Johnson is a legitimate prospect. The insanity is that Justice thinks the cash-strapped Astros just spent $4.5 million on a backup third baseman when they’re faced with a rotation that’s set to include Bud Norris, Felipe Paulno and Brian Moehler.
Sadly, the Astros are probably out of cash now and they still have two-fifths of a rotation, one above average infielder and questionable bullpen depth. It’s going to be an awfully long year for fans. Frankly, they might as well root for 100 losses, since 90 might not be enough to cost Wade his job.

MLB executive: Bruce Maxwell’s kneeling may keep him from finding work, not his arrest

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In September 2017, former Athletics catcher Bruce Maxwell became the first major league player to kneel during the national anthem, joining the handfuls of NFL players who had been doing the same to protest police brutality and racial inequality. Maxwell’s effort was laudable, but he got into trouble a month later when he was arrested for aggravated assault with a deadly weapon and disorderly conduct. Maxwell allegedly pointed a gun at a food delivery person.

Maxwell, 27, played sparingly for the Athletics in 2018 and then was designated for assignment at the beginning of September. He officially became a free agent on November 2 and has had trouble finding work in the month-plus since.

Susan Slusser of the San Francisco Chronicle reports that Maxwell fired his agent, Matt Sosnick on Thursday because he’s still jobless. According to an unnamed MLB executive Slusser spoke to, “It’s the kneeling thing that might keep him from getting another job, not the arrest. Owners aren’t going to want to deal with that whole anthem issue.”

That makes a lot of since since abusive players haven’t had too much trouble finding new work otherwise. Addison Russell, Jeurys Familia, and José Reyes, among others have either stayed with their teams or quickly found new work. Given the relatively weak catching market, had Maxwell only had the assault charge, there is no doubt he would have been signed to be a backup catcher somewhere.

In the NFL, Colin Kaepernick — who popularized kneeling during the anthem — has remained unsigned even though teams have opted to sign and start clearly inferior quarterbacks like Mark Sanchez, Josh McCown, Ryan Fitzpatrick, Jay Cutler, Matt Barkley, and Sam Bradford, among many others. Team owners tend to run conservative in terms of politics, so they may not like the protest to begin with, then there is the public blowback to signing such a player as those who dislike such protesting make up a slight majority in the U.S., according to various polls including one done by the Washington Post.

It’s worth noting that Maxwell has a career .240/.314/.347 triple-slash line in 412 plate appearances. We’re not talking about J.T. Realmuto or Buster Posey here. That being said, there have been 15 other catchers to have put up a lower aggregate OPS since 2016 (min. 400 PA). One of those players, Derek Norris (.600 OPS since 2016), signed a minor league contract with the Tigers just three months after being suspended by Major League Baseball for violating its domestic violence policy. Makes you think.