Sorry, Houston fans: Wade, Justice share same brain

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Each time I start to wonder why I still have the Houston Chronicle’s Richard Justice on my RSS reader, he produces a gem like this:

Here’s my five-minute analysis of the $4.5-million signing of Pedro Feliz. I haven’t spoken to GM Ed Wade. In other words, I’m thinking for myself. Run for your lives!
I believe Chris Johnson will still be given every opportunity to win the third-base position this spring. Remember that he was so highly regarded last spring that the Astros figured he’d spend a few weeks at Round Rock, then become the everyday third baseman.

Actually, I do remember the terribly misguided belief that Johnson was nearly ready to take over at third base. Then he went on to hit a thoroughly unexceptional .281/.323/.461 with 13 homers in 384 at-bats in the PCL.
And one of the very important things to remember here is that Johnson’s bat is the strongest part of his game. He lacks range at third base, and he offers nothing on the basepaths.
But one can still be sane and believe Johnson is a legitimate prospect. The insanity is that Justice thinks the cash-strapped Astros just spent $4.5 million on a backup third baseman when they’re faced with a rotation that’s set to include Bud Norris, Felipe Paulno and Brian Moehler.
Sadly, the Astros are probably out of cash now and they still have two-fifths of a rotation, one above average infielder and questionable bullpen depth. It’s going to be an awfully long year for fans. Frankly, they might as well root for 100 losses, since 90 might not be enough to cost Wade his job.

Marlins home run sculpture is going, going, gone!

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Not long after the new ownership group bought the Miami Marlins, face of the franchise Derek Jeter made it clear that he wanted the home runs sculpture beyond the outfield fence gone. He simply doesn’t like it aesthetically and many think that, among Jeter’s goals, he’d like to erase any trace of Jeff Loria’s legacy, which includes the sculpture.

The problem: the sculpture is not Jeter’s to remove. The sculpture is public property, purchased as part of the Art in Public Places program, which requires art to be installed for the public in county-owned buildings, which includes Marlins Park. Miami-Dade officials have said that moving it was not possible as the sculpture was “not moveable” and was “permanently installed: as it was designed specifically for Marlins Park. And that’s before you get into how logistically complicated it would be to move it. It’s seven stories tall and is connected to a hydraulic system, plumbing and there’s electricity.

What Jeter wants, however, Jeter eventually gets. From the Miami Herald:

The Miami Marlins won county permission on Tuesday to move its home-run sculpture out of Marlins Park to the plaza outside . . . In its new location outside, “Homer” will still turn on for home runs, as well as at the end of every home win and every day at 3:05 p.m., an homage to Miami’s original area code.

It may or may not be moved before Opening Day, but once it is moved there will be a new seating and standing room only area for spectators where the sculpture currently sits.