Report: Orioles offer up young arms for Millwood

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MLB.com’s T.R. Sullivan reports that the Orioles offered Brandon Erbe and David Hernandez to the Rangers for Kevin Millwood, but that talks have now “cooled off.”
Judging by the fact that the Orioles were prepared to surrender two intriguing right-handers, they must have been expecting Texas to pick up a significant portion of the $12 million that Millwood is owed next season. Even if the Rangers were willing to go that route, it’d sure make a lot more sense for the Orioles to keep their arms and go out and sign a Jon Garland or Doug Davis for their rotation.
Millwood is likely a better pitcher of those two, but it’s well worth remembering that he did post ERAs of 5.16 and 5.07 in back-to-back years before rebounding to 3.67 last season. Even his 2009 was marred by a mediocre second half. April and June were the only months of the season in which he posted a sub-4.00 ERA.
Plus, Millwood would likely be nothing more than a one-year option for a team likely to finish in fourth or fifth place. He might not even bring any draft picks as a free agent, considering that his generous salary would make offering him arbitration a risk. Taking Millwood and his salary while giving up nothing in return would be an acceptable move for the Orioles. There’s just no good reason to give up young talent for him, though.

Rangers turn the sort of triple play that has not been done in 106 years

Associated Press
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Triple plays are rare. Triple plays in which only two players touch the ball are even more rare. But last night the Texas Rangers turned a triple play that was even more rare than that. Indeed, it was the sort of triple play that had not been turned since a couple of months after the Titanic sank.

Here’s how it went down:

With the bases loaded and nobody out in the fourth inning, David Fletcher of the Angels hit a sharp one-hopper, fielded by third baseman Jurickson Profar. He stepped on third, getting the runner on second base in a force out. He then quickly tagged Taylor Ward, who had been on third base but had broken, thinking the ball was going to get through, and who froze before figuring out what to do. Profar then threw to Rougned Odor, who stepped on second to force the runner out who had been on first. Watch:

Like a lot of weird triple plays, not everyone was sure what had happened immediately. Odor, for example, had already made the third out when he touched the bag but he still attempted to tag out the runner from first, likely not yet having processed it all. The announcer wasn’t aware of it either. Understandable given how fast it all happened. It took me a couple of times watching it to figure it all out.

The historic part of it: according to STATS, Inc., it was the first triple play in 106 years in which the batter was not retired. The last time it happened: June 3, 1912, turned by the Brooklyn Dodgers against the Cincinnati Reds.