We knew it. Those Bloomberg folks are stat geeks.

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Yesterday Craig noted a “tweet” from
Will Carroll of Baseball Prospectus saying there would be “two huge
announcements
” coming at the winter meetings. Well, Richard Sandomir of the
New York Times revealed one of them in the New York Times on Saturday
night. It seems Bloomberg, best known for their financial software,
have decided to
embrace sabermetrics.


Bloomberg is actually in business with baseball. It has licensed M.L.B.’s
statistics; pitch location and velocity data; and video to create the
team software and fantasy products for fans that will roll out in
February. For the past year or so, it has been soliciting the opinions
of team executives and players about the team software.

The challenge for Bloomberg is to create software that is better,
faster and more visually useful than what rivals offer to help develop
players and predict their performances. A demonstration of Bloomberg’s
software showed dazzlingly colorful graphics and an easy way to plot
statistics and compare players in complex combinations.



Each team, according to the Times,
will get a six-month free trial of the software. I don’t expect this
announcement will resonate much with your everyday fan, but for those
who have followed Baseball Prospectus and the Hardball Times over the
years, the resources and partnership with MLBAM have to be worrisome.

Peter Bourjos returns to the Angels on minor league deal

Peter Bourjos
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Free agent outfielder Peter Bourjos is heading back to the Angels on a minor league deal, per a report from Steve Adams of MLB Trade Rumors. The agreement includes an invitation to spring training, but has not yet been officially confirmed by the team.

Bourjos, 31, played out a one-year gig with the Braves in 2018 and slashed .205/.239/.364 with four extra-base hits and a .603 OPS through a career-low 47 plate appearances. He showed more promise during a short-lived stint with the Giants’ Triple-A squad in the second half of the season, but elected free agency in early November and had yet to catch on with another major league club. His deal with the Angels represents a homecoming of sorts, as he played some of the best years of his career in Anaheim from 2010 to 2013 before getting traded to the Cardinals in a multiplayer swap for David Freese and Fernando Salas in 2014.

The veteran outfielder is long past his prime, but could still bring some value to the team as outfield depth behind Justin Upton, Mike Trout, and Kole Calhoun. Per Adams, he’s expected to compete for a spot as the Angels’ fourth outfielder, though he also has limited experience at DH as well.