We knew it. Those Bloomberg folks are stat geeks.

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Yesterday Craig noted a “tweet” from
Will Carroll of Baseball Prospectus saying there would be “two huge
announcements
” coming at the winter meetings. Well, Richard Sandomir of the
New York Times revealed one of them in the New York Times on Saturday
night. It seems Bloomberg, best known for their financial software,
have decided to
embrace sabermetrics.


Bloomberg is actually in business with baseball. It has licensed M.L.B.’s
statistics; pitch location and velocity data; and video to create the
team software and fantasy products for fans that will roll out in
February. For the past year or so, it has been soliciting the opinions
of team executives and players about the team software.

The challenge for Bloomberg is to create software that is better,
faster and more visually useful than what rivals offer to help develop
players and predict their performances. A demonstration of Bloomberg’s
software showed dazzlingly colorful graphics and an easy way to plot
statistics and compare players in complex combinations.



Each team, according to the Times,
will get a six-month free trial of the software. I don’t expect this
announcement will resonate much with your everyday fan, but for those
who have followed Baseball Prospectus and the Hardball Times over the
years, the resources and partnership with MLBAM have to be worrisome.

Minor League Baseball eclipses 40 million in attendance for 14th consecutive season

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Minor League Baseball announced on Wednesday that, for the 14th consecutive season, the league has eclipsed 40 million in total attendance. 20 teams set single-game attendance records and seven teams set franchise records for single-game attendance in their current parks.

ESPN’s Keith Law, who has been covering the minor leagues for quite a while, did the math:

Minor League Baseball president and CEO Pat O’Conner, whose most prominent stint in the public eye involved him disingenuously justifying the underpaying of his players, said, “Minor League Baseball continues to be the best entertainment value in sports, and these numbers support that. For us to top 40 million fans for the 14th consecutive season despite the weather challenges our teams faced in April and May is a testament to the continued support of our loyal fan bases and the creative promotions and hard work done by all of our teams across the country.”

Major and Minor League Baseball are quite happy to make money hand over fist on the backs of their players, but are too cheap to pay them adequately for their labor.