Buster Posey will not be the Giants' Opening Day Catcher

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If there’s a team that has less regard for young talent than the Giants, I’ve yet to see it:

The Giants’ brass met several times this week in preparation of the
winter meetings, which begin Monday in Indianapolis, and the feeling
was Posey’s not quite ready to play everyday in the big leagues,
meaning the Giants will need a buffer, someone to catch regularly until
Posey emerges for good.

General manager Brian Sabean said the front office had a “raging
debate” over whether Posey would be the No. 1 catcher, adding, “We came
to the overall conclusion it would be a tall order to ask him to do
that. He just hasn’t played a lot.”

It’s not that Sabean is into silly service time shenanigans either. If that were the case they never would have called Posey up last September (to sit on the bench, natch) and Tim Lincecum would have stayed down longer and wouldn’t be a Super Two now.  No, this is just a matter of the Giants simply not trusting young players.  Lincecum was a supernatural talent, so he forced his way in.  Mere above average kids like Posey need not apply, however.

The NL West is eminently winnable next year. The difference between the Giants winning it and losing it will likely come down to a small handful of games and a small handful of moves.  By not giving Posey the job, I think they’re already a game and a move down.

Max Scherzer, with broken nose, strikes out 10 Phillies over seven shutout innings

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Nationals starter Max Scherzer bunted a ball into his face during batting practice on Tuesday, breaking his nose in the process. He ended up with a gnarly looking shiner around his right eye, making him appear a bit like Terminator. Scherzer still took the ball to start the second game of Wednesday night’s doubleheader against the Phillies.

Despite the injury, Scherzer was incredibly effective, limiting the Phillies to four hits and two walks across seven shutout innings, striking out 10 batters in the process. He might even have had some extra adrenaline going, as he averaged 96.2 MPH on his fastball, his highest average fastball velocity in a game since September 2012, per MLB.com’s Jamal Collier. The Nationals provided Scherzer with just one run of support, coming on a Brian Dozier solo home run off of Jake Arrieta in the second inning, but it was enough.

Wander Suero worked a scoreless top of the eighth with a pair of strikeouts. Victor Robles added a solo homer off of Pat Neshek in the bottom half. Closer Sean Doolittle took over in the ninth, working a 1-2-3 frame to give the Nats their 2-0 victory.

Over his last six starts, Scherzer now has a 0.88 ERA with a 59/8 K/BB ratio across 41 innings. He has gone six innings, struck out at least nine batters, and held the opposition to two or fewer runs in each of those six starts.