Hall of Fame voter: Roberto Alomar dogged it one time, so I'm not voting for him

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On the heels of Hal Bodley’s questionable bit of reasoning comes Bill Livingston of the Cleveland Plain Dealer who likewise won’t be voting for Alomar this year.  His reasons? In addition to the idiotic “he’s no first ballot Hall of Famer” thing, he says Alomar failed to run out two ground balls that resulted in double plays in a 2001 ALDS against Seattle:

I ripped Alomar for his 0-for-4 game in the 3-1 season-ending loss
and, more, for his lackadaisical attitude. This was not picking on a
player for one bad day. That can happen to anyone. His lack of effort,
however, struck at the core values of the game.

When Mark Shapiro was named the new general manager after the
season, replacing John Hart, I brought up Alomar’s fifth-game
performance in a meeting. Shapiro admitted that Alomar did not give his
all that day. He knew the player was a diva, and traded him before the
next season.

For starters, I wonder if Shapiro will go on record today admitting that he called Alomar a diva who didn’t give his all in a playoff game.  If he will, sure, maybe there’s a bit more to Livingston’s beef.  If not, we’re left with one writer’s subjective view of things. Anyone wanna ask Shapiro about it?

Either way, I’m not sure how you look at 2700 hits, ten gold gloves, a .300 career average, superior numbers in most advanced metrics and two World Series rings and say “Sorry, but no. There was this day back in 2001 that he didn’t make it down the line fast enough.”  What player could possibly pass that test?

Assault charges against Roberto Osuna withdrawn, peace bond issued

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Astros reliever Roberto Osuna appeared in an Ontario court today, where the assault charges against him were withdrawn. In their place is now a one-year peace bond, which is akin to a restraining order combined with probation. Pursuant to the peace bond Osuna is required to continue with counseling he has undertaken, to not get in any legal trouble and to have no contact with his accuser without court consent for the next year.

The reason for the revocation of the charges is that, according to prosecutors, the complainant is in Mexico and would not return to Canada for a trial against Osuna. Without her testimony the case against Osuna could not be won. The peace bond, then, was the only real option.

Osuna was arrested in Toronto while still playing for the Blue Jays and was charged with assaulting a woman on May 8. Major League Baseball suspended him for 75 games under the league’s domestic violence policy. The Blue Jays traded him to the Astros on July 30 in exchange for Ken Giles and two minor leaguers and he has pitched for the Astros ever since. This latest hearing was scheduled to coincide with the Astros’ trip to Toronto this week.

The Astros issued a statement:

And statements from Osuna and his attorney: