Don Fehr speaks

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Outgoing union head Don Fehr, the guy baseball fans love to hate, sat for an extended interview and as you might expect, said a few interesting things.  Most interesting to me is his answer to the question about his biggest regret:

“There’s not anything that I’m prepared to talk about with one
exception. In 1994, when we went on strike, we went out in early
August. We thought that would give us an opportunity to force
negotiations, to get an agreement, and we would save the season and the World Series
If we had known at the time there would be zero possibility of that, we
would have waited another month, month-and-a-half. The strike probably
wouldn’t have begun until mid- to late September. But we didn’t know
that. … We were optimists.”

I can’t help but think that the “not anything I’m prepared to talk about” comment covers an awful lot of territory. Probably a lot of it being hyper-sensitive confidential stuff that lawyers and union heads tend to get involved in.

I also can’t help but think a lot of that has to do with the manner in which he and the union handled PEDs.  He holds forth on steroids more later in the interview, giving his standard — and arguably defensible — answer about how his job was to advance players interests and nothing more, and that resisting PED testing was part of that. Still, I think he ultimately muffed the PED issue even on that basis, even if it was something that was hard to see at the time. He may or may not come to admit that later, but today is probably too early to hear any mea culpas from the guy on the subject.

But I am perplexed about the regret he cites. He admits that even if the strike was pushed off a bit, there was no way to save the World Series in 1994.  Why, then, it makes any difference that it happened in September instead of August is a mystery to me. So we could have gotten closer to seeing Matt Williams hit 61 home runs? So Expos fans could have gotten closer to having the future of their team saved only to have it ripped from them like it was?

Anyway, I know a lot of you love to slam Fehr, so feel free to read the interview and refresh your stores of ammunition.

Rakuten Golden Eagles sign Jabari Blash

Jabari Blash
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Former Angels outfielder Jabari Blash has signed a one-year deal with the Tohoku Rakuten Golden Eagles of Nippon Professional Baseball, the team announced Friday. Per the Japan Times, the deal is said to be worth around $1.06 million. Blash was released from his contract with the Angels at the end of November.

The 29-year-old outfielder has had a rough go of it in the majors, where he failed to duplicate the promising results he delivered in the minors. While he consistently batted above .250 with 20-30 home runs per season at the Double- and Triple-A level, he petered out in back-to-back gigs with the Padres and Angels and slumped toward a .103/.200/.128 finish across 45 PA for Anaheim in 2018.

The hope, of course, is that the environment in NPB will help him get a better handle on his issues at the plate — in a best case scenario, resulting in a full-scale transformation that could make him more marketable to MLB teams in the future. To that end, Blash expects to be utilized as a cleanup batter in the Eagles’ lineup and will focus on assisting the club as they make a run toward the Japan Series.