Don Fehr speaks

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Outgoing union head Don Fehr, the guy baseball fans love to hate, sat for an extended interview and as you might expect, said a few interesting things.  Most interesting to me is his answer to the question about his biggest regret:

“There’s not anything that I’m prepared to talk about with one
exception. In 1994, when we went on strike, we went out in early
August. We thought that would give us an opportunity to force
negotiations, to get an agreement, and we would save the season and the World Series
If we had known at the time there would be zero possibility of that, we
would have waited another month, month-and-a-half. The strike probably
wouldn’t have begun until mid- to late September. But we didn’t know
that. … We were optimists.”

I can’t help but think that the “not anything I’m prepared to talk about” comment covers an awful lot of territory. Probably a lot of it being hyper-sensitive confidential stuff that lawyers and union heads tend to get involved in.

I also can’t help but think a lot of that has to do with the manner in which he and the union handled PEDs.  He holds forth on steroids more later in the interview, giving his standard — and arguably defensible — answer about how his job was to advance players interests and nothing more, and that resisting PED testing was part of that. Still, I think he ultimately muffed the PED issue even on that basis, even if it was something that was hard to see at the time. He may or may not come to admit that later, but today is probably too early to hear any mea culpas from the guy on the subject.

But I am perplexed about the regret he cites. He admits that even if the strike was pushed off a bit, there was no way to save the World Series in 1994.  Why, then, it makes any difference that it happened in September instead of August is a mystery to me. So we could have gotten closer to seeing Matt Williams hit 61 home runs? So Expos fans could have gotten closer to having the future of their team saved only to have it ripped from them like it was?

Anyway, I know a lot of you love to slam Fehr, so feel free to read the interview and refresh your stores of ammunition.

Zac Rosscup throws immaculate inning, lands on DL

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A day after throwing an immaculate inning — getting through an inning on three consecutive strikeouts with nine pitches — against the Mariners, Dodgers reliever Zac Rosscup was placed on the 10-day disabled list with a left calf strain. The move made room on the 25-man roster for Kenley Jansen, who is back after missing some time due to an irregular heartbeat.

Rosscup pitched the ninth inning of Sunday’s 12-1 win over the Mariners. He struck out Kyle Seager, Ryon Healy, and Cameron Maybin on three pitches each. Rosscup is the fourth pitcher to throw an immaculate inning this season, joining Kevin Gausman, Max Scherzer, and German Marquez. 2018’s four immaculate innings is still far behind 2017’s record of eight.

Rosscup has pitched only 6 2/3 innings in the majors this year. He has yielded five runs (all earned) on seven hits and a walk with 10 strikeouts. He missed a significant amount of time earlier this season due to a blister on his left middle finger.