Don Fehr speaks

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Outgoing union head Don Fehr, the guy baseball fans love to hate, sat for an extended interview and as you might expect, said a few interesting things.  Most interesting to me is his answer to the question about his biggest regret:

“There’s not anything that I’m prepared to talk about with one
exception. In 1994, when we went on strike, we went out in early
August. We thought that would give us an opportunity to force
negotiations, to get an agreement, and we would save the season and the World Series
If we had known at the time there would be zero possibility of that, we
would have waited another month, month-and-a-half. The strike probably
wouldn’t have begun until mid- to late September. But we didn’t know
that. … We were optimists.”

I can’t help but think that the “not anything I’m prepared to talk about” comment covers an awful lot of territory. Probably a lot of it being hyper-sensitive confidential stuff that lawyers and union heads tend to get involved in.

I also can’t help but think a lot of that has to do with the manner in which he and the union handled PEDs.  He holds forth on steroids more later in the interview, giving his standard — and arguably defensible — answer about how his job was to advance players interests and nothing more, and that resisting PED testing was part of that. Still, I think he ultimately muffed the PED issue even on that basis, even if it was something that was hard to see at the time. He may or may not come to admit that later, but today is probably too early to hear any mea culpas from the guy on the subject.

But I am perplexed about the regret he cites. He admits that even if the strike was pushed off a bit, there was no way to save the World Series in 1994.  Why, then, it makes any difference that it happened in September instead of August is a mystery to me. So we could have gotten closer to seeing Matt Williams hit 61 home runs? So Expos fans could have gotten closer to having the future of their team saved only to have it ripped from them like it was?

Anyway, I know a lot of you love to slam Fehr, so feel free to read the interview and refresh your stores of ammunition.

Twins reach historic home run total during 11-4 rout of White Sox

Max Kepler
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The Twins trampled the White Sox on Friday night, cruising to a cool 11-4 lead over their division rivals and collecting their sixth double-digit win of 2019. Even more impressive, they picked up their 99th, 100th, and 101st home runs, a feat that’s rarely been matched in a team’s first 50 games of any given season.

The first homer of the night was delivered by Eddie Rosario in the third inning. Working against a single-run deficit, Rosario lifted an 0-1 fastball from the White Sox’ Reynaldo López, planting it firmly in the left field stands and evening the score, 4-4. Two batters later, Rosario’s solo home run got a sequel: a 398-footer from Miguel Sanó, this one postmarked for the upper deck in left.

In the fourth, now leading 5-4, the Twins saw a third and final homer from the bat of Max Kepler, whose center-field blast traveled a projected 397 feet to give the club a two-run advantage. Per MLB Stats, the Twins’ record — 101 homers in 50 games — stands second only to that of the 1999 Mariners, who managed to club 102 home runs before their 51st game of the season.

While the record has undoubtedly been a team effort, Rosario leads the pack with a team-best 15 homers so far this year, closely followed by C.J. Cron (13), Max Kepler (11), and Jonathan Schoop (10). Sanó, whose solo shot marked the team’s 100th home run of 2019, has just five, though there’s little doubt he’ll reach double digits before the end of the season.

According to MLB.com’s Do-Hyoung Park, the Twins also made it to an even 300 runs scored in 2019, for a satisfying average of six runs per game and a new franchise record (previous high mark: 273 runs scored in 1992). With the win, they improved to 34-16 on the year and continue to hold a comfortable eight-game lead in the AL Central.