Comment of the Day: the Hall of Fame voters are worse than we thought

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Reader CasEjonz, reacting to Hal Bodley’s “Roberto Alomar is no first ballot Hall of Famer” rebop, notes that the writers are way worse when it comes to this stuff than even I suggested. Take the complete lack of unanimous Hall of Fame votes:

To this point, Tom Seaver and Nolan Ryan are the closest to 100% at 98.8%. The fact that some voters can not see an obviously worthy player, makes
the notion of even “first ballot” distinction moot. If they cant get
the obvious, then how much merit can we put behind their selections
whether it is a first timer or a fifteenth timer. I can’t wait for
those same writers to argue why Ken Griffey Jr and Derek Jeter aren’t
worthy of an automatic vote, but will argue for some fringe guy that
they got a Christmas card from.

Excellent point. Willie Freakin’ Mays was not a unanimous vote. Mickey Freakin’ Mantle was not a unanimous vote.  A voter’s discretion is a wonderful thing and I’d be loathe to mess with it, but if you have guys like that staring at you on the ballot and you can’t pull the lever, you’ve forfeited the franchise, my friend.

Minor League Baseball eclipses 40 million in attendance for 14th consecutive season

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Minor League Baseball announced on Wednesday that, for the 14th consecutive season, the league has eclipsed 40 million in total attendance. 20 teams set single-game attendance records and seven teams set franchise records for single-game attendance in their current parks.

ESPN’s Keith Law, who has been covering the minor leagues for quite a while, did the math:

Minor League Baseball president and CEO Pat O’Conner, whose most prominent stint in the public eye involved him disingenuously justifying the underpaying of his players, said, “Minor League Baseball continues to be the best entertainment value in sports, and these numbers support that. For us to top 40 million fans for the 14th consecutive season despite the weather challenges our teams faced in April and May is a testament to the continued support of our loyal fan bases and the creative promotions and hard work done by all of our teams across the country.”

Major and Minor League Baseball are quite happy to make money hand over fist on the backs of their players, but are too cheap to pay them adequately for their labor.