Arroyo and Gleeman agree: Reds are confusing

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When reports surfaced last week that the Reds “need to slash payroll” and may be forced to shed high-priced veterans I wrote about the horrible planning that led to their trading three players to acquire Scott Rolen and his $12 million 2010 contract just months ago.
Cincinnati had no business taking on a salary like that if the team’s financial situation was in question and apparently one of the high-priced veterans who may be shopped as a result agrees with me. Here’s what Bronson Arroyo recently had to say about the front office’s lack of planning:

In my mind, there was no reason to get Rolen if we’re turning around and moving guys without waiting to see what happens. I think they’ll give us four months to see if we can compete in the division. If we’re not, we’ll have a big scale back. For now, they seem committed to win.



I know the budget is tight, but if you re-sign Ramon [Hernandez] for a year, why then go in the other direction? If we were saving, we could have easily had [Ryan] Hanigan catching 130 games next year.

If that last part about Ramon Hernandez and Ryan Hanigan looks familiar, it’s because I wrote basically the same thing last week when the Reds spent $3 million to re-sign the veteran catcher. In fact, my exact quote was that “the Reds could have saved $3 million and simply made Hanigan their starter behind the plate” because “a few million bucks certainly could have come in handy.”
It’s not often that a starting pitcher who “hasn’t paid any attention to it” while vacationing “on his boat sailing off of the Florida coast” and some doofus blogger can both immediately agree that the front office is doing some strange things, but the Reds’ lack of foresight is apparently obvious to everyone but them.

Anthems, first pitches and other ceremonial stuff

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The World Series is not just about the baseball. It’s about the bigger-than-usual stars singing the National Anthem, the more-famous-than-usual people throwing out the first pitch and all of the assorted to-do which surrounds the ballgames. Here is that sort of stuff for Game 1 and Game 2 in Boston.

First pitches:

  • Carl Yastrzemski will throw out the ceremonial first pitch for Game 1. Yastrzemski also threw out the first pitch of Game 1 in 2004, 2007 and 2013. The Red Sox won each of those games and each of those World Series so, yeah, go with what works, right?
  • Members of the 2004 World Series Champions will throw the ceremonial first pitch of Game 2. It doesn’t say which members, so maybe my dream of Manny Ramirez doing it will work out after all. Hey, he played for the Dodgers too, so let’s make this happen, OK?

National Anthems:

  • Singer-songwriter James Taylor will perform the National Anthem prior to the start of Game 1. This morning Peter Gammons tweeted that Taylor’s family helped build Fenway Park. Let’s file that under “interesting, but not so interesting that it’s really worth tracking down to confirm, so why not believe it?” Sweet dreams and flying machines in pieces on the ground.
  • For Game 2 the National Anthem will be performed by the Boston Pops, with the Tanglewood Chorus and the Boston Symphony Children’s Chorus doing the singing. The Boston Pops are conducted by Keith Lockhart, who was a career .287/.354/.425 hitter in 37 postseason games with the Atlanta Braves. I mean, at least I’m pretty sure it’s the same Keith Lockhart. Again: not interesting enough to check so, like Gammons’ thing about James Taylor, let’s assume I’m right about this.

Play ball.