Drew's shoulder surgery won't affect contract status

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jddrew.jpgEarlier this morning I wrote about Nick Cafardo’s column from the Boston Globe that mentioned J.D. Drew underwent surgery on his left shoulder last week to alleviate inflammation he suffered with after the All-Star break.

The Red Sox have an out-clause based on the pre-existing condition in Drew’s right shoulder, according to Cot’s Baseball Contracts, but because the the surgery was on his left shoulder, the clause doesn’t come into play.

Boston may opt out of the final two season’s of Drew’s control if he
spends 35 days on the disabled with injuries related to the right shoulder
condition or if he finishes next season on
the disabled list and can’t play the outfield in 2011.

Drew, 34, signed a five-year, $70 million contract with the Red Sox in
January of 2007. He batted .279/.392/.522 with 24 homers and 68 RBI
in 452 at-bats last season. Among major league outfielders, only Ryan
Braun and teammate Jason Bay were better than Drew’s .914 OPS.

He is owed $28 million over the next two seasons, but the recent procedure on his left shoulder shouldn’t prevent him from being ready for the start of spring training.

Minor League Baseball eclipses 40 million in attendance for 14th consecutive season

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Minor League Baseball announced on Wednesday that, for the 14th consecutive season, the league has eclipsed 40 million in total attendance. 20 teams set single-game attendance records and seven teams set franchise records for single-game attendance in their current parks.

ESPN’s Keith Law, who has been covering the minor leagues for quite a while, did the math:

Minor League Baseball president and CEO Pat O’Conner, whose most prominent stint in the public eye involved him disingenuously justifying the underpaying of his players, said, “Minor League Baseball continues to be the best entertainment value in sports, and these numbers support that. For us to top 40 million fans for the 14th consecutive season despite the weather challenges our teams faced in April and May is a testament to the continued support of our loyal fan bases and the creative promotions and hard work done by all of our teams across the country.”

Major and Minor League Baseball are quite happy to make money hand over fist on the backs of their players, but are too cheap to pay them adequately for their labor.