Sign stealing: a waste of time, but easy enough to defend against

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ESPN’s Buster Olney reproduces an email he received from former major league catcher Brent Mayne talking about sign stealing and mound visits and stuff.

It’s pretty illuminating.  Among the the tidbits he offers are that most hitters don’t want stolen signs flashed to them by their teammates anyway. I can see that: how much time do you have to prepare for a pitch in the first place? Not a ton, so why would you want to take your eyes of the pitcher for the second or two you’d need to focus on the baserunner bouncing around down at second base?

Also, if you think the bad guys are stealing signs, you’re much better off simply using a subtle indicator of some sort to change signs pursuant to a pre-set pattern as opposed to having mound visits. If you have multiple conferences on the mound the other team knows you’re changing up, and they’ll know they need to pay closer attention and try to steal a new set of signs.

Mayne sounds pretty sensible in all of this. Maybe Jorge Posada and CC Sabathia should call him this winter for a couple of tips.

The Dodgers do not have a general manager, but they have an assistant general manager

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LAS VEGAS — Farhan Zaidi left his job as the general manager of the Los Angeles Dodgers to become the president of baseball operations for the San Francisco Giants. While Dodgers president Andrew Friedman remains at the top of the baseball operations department, Zaidi’s departure has left the Dodgers without a general manager. It happens. It also happens that the Dodgers do not plan to replace Zaidi with a new general manager any time soon. They just said so last week.

They do, however, have an assistant general manager now. It’s Jeff Kingston, late of the Seattle Mariners, where he served as Jerry Dipoto’s assistant. Now he is an assistant with no one, nominally, to assist. Seems like some sort of dividing by zero error, philosophically speaking, but we’ll just assume it’ll sort itself out.

Two less cosmic takeaways from this: 1. Kingston is an analytics guy who has typically advised the wheeler-dealer — Dipoto — so it’s fairly safe to assume he’ll do that in Los Angeles too; and 2. that a team is happy to proceed without a general manager should tell you where general managers, well, in general, stand in this age of title inflation in baseball front offices.

I imagine that, after some time in the organization, Kingston will be named the actual general manager with no real change in his duties, further underscoring that, in this day and age, the title of GM is like the value of a Zimbabwean dollar.