Johnny Damon is pricing his way out of New York

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SI’s Jon Heyman listened to Scott Boras hold court up at the GM meetings in Chicago, and reports that (a) Boras thinks that Damon should get a four-year deal; (b) Damon doesn’t want less than his current $13 million; (c) the Yankees are saying that they are “absolutely not” going to offer him four years  — more like 2; (d) the Yankees offer would be at $10 million per; and (e) the Giants have some interest in Damon.

Setting aside for a moment the fact that Heyman’s report reads more like a press release for Johnny Damon as opposed to a news story (Jon: the reason Damon leads many other players in stats measured “over the past 12 seasons” is because he’s old!) let’s parse this:

Just because the Yankees have more money than God doesn’t mean that they’re going to throw it away stupidly. Indeed, in the past few years we’ve seen the Yankees move from a model of spending outrageous amounts of money stupidly to spending outrageous amounts of money wisely. If you’re the Yankees, in an offseason where almost every other team is looking to slash payroll, and there are at least three all-star caliber left fielders around, why on earth would you give the oldest one $52 million over four years? If I’m Brain Cashman I call the bluff on Damon, wish him well in that big outfield in San Francisco and focus my attention on Matt Holliday.

Which, come to think of it, may be Boras’ hope anyway. If the Yankees are eliminated as a Damon suitor — and a hard demand for a four year deal for the guy should eliminate them — it opens up the market for Holliday, also a Boras client, considerably.

Blue Jays call up Cavan Biggio

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Cavan Biggio, son of Hall of Famer Craig Biggio, has been called up by the Toronto Blue Jays.

Biggio, 24, was a fifth round selection in the 2016 draft. So far this year he has put up a .307/.445/.504 batting line with six home runs and five steals Triple-A Buffalo. He’s a utility guy of sorts, having spent time at first, second, third and all three outfield positions so far this year. He, perhaps ironically, has not caught yet in his pro career, nor does he play short. Still, that kind of flexibility in a young player can be pretty useful in this age of big bullpens. Especially if he continues to rake like he has. He’ll likely mostly play second base for the Jays starting out.

With Vlad Guerrero Jr. playing third base every day, Toronto now has two sons of Hall of Famers on their roster. That’s pretty neat.