Tim Lincecum cited for marijuana possession following traffic stop

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Tim Lincecum is facing misdemeanor drug possession charges after being found with 3.3 grams of marijuana during a routine traffic stop last week.
According to police, Lincecum was stopped for going 74 miles per hour in a 60-mph zone in his home state of Washington last Friday morning and the state trooper smelled marijuana coming from inside the car, at which point the reigning National League Cy Young winner reached into his dashboard to produce a small pouch and a pipe.
The amount is considered small enough for personal use only and Lincecum was not found to be impaired in any way, so he’s not being charged with a felony. “With this amount of marijuana, that’s normally the way we deal with it,” Washington State Patrol spokesman Steve Schatzel said. Lincecum received a $622 citation and was released, with a arraignment scheduled for later this month.
Lincecum is unlikely to face punishment from the Giants, although the charges could potentially impact his upcoming arbitration hearing. After going 15-7 with a 2.48 ERA and NL-high 261 strikeouts this season Lincecum is arbitration eligible for the first time and figures to see a huge bump in salary. There will no doubt be outrage about this incident in certain circles, but ultimately a 25-year-old smoking marijuana is hardly shocking and the small amount combined with his lack of impairment makes it a relative non-story.

Minor League Baseball had its worst attendance in 14 years

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Baseball American reports today that total attendance at minor league baseball games reached a 14-year low in 2018. Total attendance was 40,450,337. That’s a drop of 1,382,027 fans compared to last season.

Around a third of that drop is attributable to fewer scheduled games but, as Baseball America notes, even when you go to average attendance per game, there was a sharp drop off this season. BA suggests that this represents a leveling off after over a decade’s worth of large increases in minor league attendance. Which sound pretty plausible. Overall, attendance numbers are still massively above where they were 15-20 years ago, so this seems more like a correction than a real problem. The BA article goes into some good analysis of the decline.

All of that said, revenues are up for the minors, in large part because of merchandise sales and because minor league ballparks have a lot more amenities and better concessions than they used to have and fans are willing to pay for them.