Jamie McCourt to the Dodgers: "Get out of my divorce"

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Jamie McCourt still wants to own the Dodgers, she just doesn’t want them filing legal briefs in which the team accuses her of cheating on her husband:

Jamie McCourt argued in a motion Monday that the Dodgers should not be a party in a divorce hearing, asking the court to throw out papers filed in the team’s name that “unnecessarily and gratuitously attack” her.

The motion is expected to be considered Thursday in Los Angeles Superior Court as part of a hearing to determine the validity of McCourt’s demand for immediate reinstatement as the Dodgers’ chief executive.

I think she has a good point here, because if anyone should be allowed to “gratuitously attack” her for messing around with her bodyguard (or whatever he is), it shouldn’t be the Dodgers, who actually made the filing she’s complaining about. It should be her husband Frank, and so far he’s been missing from this affair.  At least technically so. Fact is that the “Dodgers'” papers were written and filed by Frank’s own divorce lawyer, which means that Frank is trying to use the team’s good name to advance legal arguments he doesn’t necessarily want to make himself. 

In reality, the Dodgers probably have a place in the lawsuit insofar as Jamie has asked to be reinstated, and the Dodgers, as an entity, probably have a right to say that they do not want to be forced to re-hire a terminated employee. They should not, however, be used as Frank’s sock puppet to accuse their former employee of being an unfaithful hussy who shouldn’t have her job back.  If Frank wants to accuse his wife of stuff, he should man up and say it himself in his own legal papers. Businesses are generally well-advised to not publicly comment on the reasons why someone gets fired.

Bonus reason for kicking the Dodgers out of the suit: it will prevent these overpaid children from further dragging a once proud and respectable  brand name into the muck.

There was another miscommunication between the Phillies and Pat Neshek

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Back in June 2017, then-manager of the Phillies Pete Mackanin and reliever Pat Neshek had some miscommunication. In a series against the Cardinals, Neshek worked a five-pitch eighth inning and it was believed he would come back out for the ninth inning, but he never did. Mackanin said Neshek said he didn’t want to pitch another inning. Neshek said he was never asked. There was also some miscommunication the game prior. Neshek thought he had the day off; Mackanin said Neshek said he wasn’t available to pitch.

Mackanin is no longer the Phillies’ manager, but the miscommunication between Neshek and the team apparently persist. Neshek was notably absent during the Phillies’ hard-fought 5-4 win over the Cubs on Monday night. The game featured a struggling Seranthony Domínguez pitching two innings, yielding three crucial runs in his second inning of work.

Manager Gabe Kapler called the bullpen and instructed Neshek to begin warming up to prepare to face Albert Almora, Matt Breen of the Philadelphia Inquirer reports. Kapler rang the bullpen after Domínguez walked Jason Heyward, who batted ahead of Almora. Neshek wasn’t warmed up yet. Domínguez was able to retire Almora on a sacrifice bunt, which was reviewed and gave Neshek some extra time to get ready. He was ready for the next batter, Daniel Descalso, but at this point Kapler no longer wanted to bring Neshek into the game. Descalso lined a triple to left-center field, scoring two runs and came home himself when shortstop Jean Segura‘s throw caromed off of his foot out of play.

Recounting the situation, Neshek said, “I got on the mound and threw two pitches. [Kapler] said, ‘Is he ready?’ And I said, ‘No. I’m not ready yet. I’ve thrown two pitches.” Neshek was asked how long it takes him to get ready. The veteran said, “A minute. Not 20 seconds. I’m, like, the best in the league at getting ready. My whole career has been coming in like that.”

The Phillies were able to eke out a 5-4 win. Had they lost the game, Kapler and Neshek would likely have been under the microscope for the awkward situation leading to a crushing defeat. Kapler drew plenty of criticism over his bullpen management last year in his rookie managerial season. That included bringing in lefty reliever Hoby Milner into a game in which he hadn’t yet warmed up.

Maybe it’s just a coincidence that the manager who struggled with bullpen management last year nearly mucked up a win last night, and maybe it’s just a coincidence that a reliever who’s had prior issues with communication had another communication mix-up. Maybe it’s not. It’s worth noting that the Phillies needed three innings from the bullpen to protect a 2-1 lead over the Cubs on Tuesday. Kapler called on rookie Edgar Garcia for two outs, lefty José Álvarez for four, and then brought in Juan Nicasio to close things out in the ninth. No Neshek, even as Nicasio got into trouble. Nicasio would surrender the tying and go-ahead runs, resulting in a deflating 3-2 loss.