With seven free agents, change coming for Angels

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The Angels made the right calls a year ago in declining to ante up for Mark Teixeira and turning instead to Kendry Morales and Bobby Abreu to round out their lineup. Factoring into the decision was that GM Tony Reagins knew Teixeira’s $20 million salary would make it very difficult to keep the team together starting in 2010. The Angels have seven free agents this winter, and those players combined to make more than $50 million in 2009. For that reason, Reagins is going to be faced with as many difficult decisions as any GM in the game.
Let’s run down the list (rankings taken from our Top 111 Free Agents):
Robb Quinlan (not rated) – Quinlan has been pretty worthless coming off the bench for three straight years now, finishing with OPSs of 652, 637 and 614. If the Angels want to continue carrying a right-handed reserve for first and third, then minor leaguer Matt Brown could prove to be an upgrade.
Kelvim Escobar (No. 104) – Escobar, who made $9.5 million this year, pitched a total of five innings over the last two years because of shoulder problems. If he’s re-signed, it would be to a one-year deal with a minimal guarantee and plenty of incentives.
Darren Oliver (No. 77) – Oliver accepted arbitration as a free agent after last season and ended up taking a one-year, $3.665 million contract. Something similar could happen this winter. Oliver would probably draw a couple of two-year offers if he shopped himself around, but he’s talked about just pitching one more season anyway and he’d likely prefer to do it in Anaheim.
Vladimir Guerrero (No. 17) – It’s been assumed for months that Guerrero wasn’t in the Angels’ plans for 2010, but the excellent postseason will add to the sentiment for keeping him. He hit .378/.425/.541 with seven RBI in nine games against the Red Sox and Yankees. Guerrero would surely prefer to stay in the area, and he’s a favorite of owner Arte Moreno. Odds are that he’s a goner, but perhaps if the Angels can’t get anything done with the next person on the list, they’ll reach back out to him.
Bobby Abreu (No. 16) – Abreu expected two-year offers in the $30 million range after last season, only to eventually have to settle for $5 million over one year from the Angels. Now that’s bounced back defensively and he can benefit from a free-agent market that’s short on left-handed-hitting outfielders — he and Johnny Damon are clearly the best — he shouldn’t have much difficulty landing a multiyear pact. The Angels reportedly offered him $16 million for two years earlier this month, only to have it turned down. A two-year, $20 million deal would be fair for both parties.
Chone Figgins (No. 5) – Another ugly postseason won’t help Figgins, but it’s probably not going to hurt too much, either. The 31-year-old was an exceptional player until October, hitting .298 and leading the AL with 101 walks. Versatility also works in his favor. Not only is he arguably the best third baseman on the market, but he’s probably the best center fielder as well. Since that will increase his number of suitors, he could land a four-year deal worth $12 million per season. The Angels have Brandon Wood ready to take over at third base if they lose him.
John Lackey (No. 3) – There’s no replacing the ace, though. The Angels still have Jared Weaver, Joe Saunders, Ervin Santana and Scott Kazmir under control, giving them a fine regular-season rotation in the event of Lackey’s departure. But who from that group is going to start Game 1 against the Yankees or Red Sox? Lackey is the one free agent the Angels simply must keep, and there should be more than enough money to make it happen.
The Angels are expected to dabble in the Matt Holliday sweepstakes, but it’d make a lot more sense to keep Lackey and Abreu than it would to pay even more for Holliday and Randy Wolf. If the Angels retain those two and Oliver, they shouldn’t have a lot of difficulty filling the other gaps. Wood is ready to take over at third, and Erick Aybar is an option to replace Figgins in the leadoff spot. The Angels will also look at potential leadoff-hitting left fielders, with the idea that they can give Juan Rivera more DH time.
In the end, there’s really no way Reagins can play it badly enough for the Angels to enter 2010 as anything less than the AL West favorites. However, the division is improving as quickly as any in baseball. If the Angels don’t get start getting younger, they might find themselves poorly set up for 2011 and beyond.

New bill to build Athletics stadium on Las Vegas Strip caps Nevada’s cost at $380 million

D. Ross Cameron-USA TODAY Sports
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CARSON CITY, Nev. — A bill introduced in the Nevada Legislature would give the Oakland Athletics up to $380 million for a potential 30,000 seat, $1.5 billion retractable roof stadium on the Las Vegas Strip.

The bulk of the public funding would come from $180 million in transferable tax credits from the state and $120 million in county bonds, which can vary based on interest rate returns. Clark County also would contribute $25 million in credit toward infrastructure costs.

The A’s have been looking for a home to replace Oakland Coliseum, where the team has played since arriving from Kansas City for the 1968 season. The team had sought to build a stadium in Fremont, San Jose and finally the Oakland waterfront, all ideas that never materialized.

The plan in the Nevada Legislature won’t directly raise taxes. It can move forward with a simply majority vote in the Senate and Assembly. Lawmakers have a little more than a week to consider the proposal before they adjourn June 5, though it could be voted on if a special session is called.

The Athletics have agreed to use land on the southern end of the Las Vegas Strip, where the Tropicana Las Vegas casino resort sits. Oakland Mayor Sheng Thao has said he is disappointed the team didn’t negotiate with Oakland as a “true partner.”

Las Vegas would be the fourth home for a franchise that started as the Philadelphia Athletics from 1901-54. It would become the smallest TV market in Major League Baseball and the smallest market to be home to three major professional sports franchises.

The team and Las Vegas are hoping to draw from the nearly 40 million tourists who visit the city annually to help fill the stadium. The 30,000-seat capacity would make it the smallest MLB stadium.

MLB Commissioner Rob Manfred said a vote on the Oakland Athletics’ prospective move to Las Vegas could take place when owners meet June 13-15 in New York.

The plan faces an uncertain path in the Nevada Legislature. Democratic leaders said financing bills, including for the A’s, may not go through if Republican Gov. Joe Lombardo vetoes the five budget bills, which he has threatened to do as many of his priorities have stalled or faded in the Democratic-controlled Legislature.

Under the bill, the Clark County Board of Commissioners would create a homelessness prevention and assistance fund along the stadium’s area in coordination with MLB and the Nevada Resort Association. There, they would manage funds for services, including emergency rental and utility assistance, job training, rehabilitation and counseling services for people experiencing or at risk of homelessness.

The lease agreement with the Las Vegas Stadium Authority would be up for renewal after 30 years.

Nevada’s legislative leadership is reviewing the proposal, Democratic state Assembly Speaker Steve Yeager said in a statement.

“No commitment will be made until we have both evaluated the official proposal and received input from interested parties, including impacted community members,” Yeager said.