It's Saunders (and possibly everybody else) in Game 6

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Saturday’s postponement gave manager
Mike Scioscia an opportunity to start Jered Weaver on regular rest,
however he will go ahead with Joe Saunders, as scheduled, against Andy
Pettitte. Saunders allowed two runs over seven innings as part of a
no-decision in Game 2.

With their backs against the wall, it will be all hands on deck for the Angels. John Lackey, Jered Weaver, Scott Kazmir and Ervin Santana will all be available out of the bullpen, if necessary.

It’s going to give us some more options to look at, absolutely,” Scioscia
said. “We’ll have our whole staff out there tomorrow. Lackey is still
in play tomorrow. We’ll get through Game 6. There’s no sense talking
about a Game 7.”

Though Lackey is available in Game
6, Scioscia will surely try to save his horse for a possible Game 7.
The Angels still have some work to do, but it’s pretty clear who will
get the call if there’s a decisive game, at least according to Weaver.

“Yeah, I would think so,” he said. “That’s our horse. He’s a guy who
loves pitching in big games. We all do. He’s obviously had a little
more experience in that regard. Whatever they do that’s best for the
team, I’m good with that.”



He gone! Hawk Harrelson called his last game yesterday

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Ken Harrelson has been broadcasting for decades but yesterday was his last one. As of today the Hawk has hung up his mic and entered retirement. He gone!

Harrelson, 77, who played in the majors for nine seasons with the A’s, Red Sox, Indians and Senators and led the AL in RBI in 1968. He was also the White Sox’ general manager for a single season in the mid-80s. That didn’t go well — he famously fired Tony La Russa and Dave Dombrowski and traded away a young Bobby Bonilla, but his career as a broadcaster went swimmingly.

Harrelson served as a Red Sox broadcaster from 1975 through 1981. Despite his reputation as an unrepentant homer for his White Sox — who he called “the good guys,” as opposed to the “bad guys” playing them — he was actually fired as a Red Sox broadcaster for being critical of ownership. He then embarked on his first stint with the White Sox before his move into the front office, worked as a Yankees broadcaster from 1987-88 and worked games for NBC’s Game of the Week in the mid-1980s as well. He then returned to call games for the White Sox in 1990 and the rest is history.

Hawk will still be a team ambassador for Chicago so he not totally gone, but the White Sox broadcast booth is entering a new era.