The Yankees say they don't really want Holliday

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Frank Russo at the New York Baseball Digest blog gets some Yankee response to that story about Matt Holliday wanting to play for the Yankees:

Our main Yankees source down it Tampa informed us last night that, at this time,  Yankees management has no interest in getting involved in the Matt Holliday sweepstakes. “It’s way too early,” our source told us. “Brian (Cashman) has a lot of decisions to make, especially with Matsui and Damon.”I don’t care how bad the kid wants to play for the Yanks, Scott (Boras) will be asking for the moon and they’re not going to break the bank for him.”

Which may be true. Of course they said the same kinds of things about Johnny Damon and Mark Teixeira and Alex Rodriguez and just about every other free agent they’ve pursued in the past.

Which is really smart.  The Yankees get a lot of crap for just going out and buying talent, but it’s not like they’re always out there setting the market.  They often let other teams weigh in, get a range of offers out there, and then come in and offer a bit more.  I think they bid against themselves with the Alex Rodriguez extension, but in all other cases, they waited everyone else out, as a smart bidder should.

I have no idea if Holliday will actually end up in New York, but if he does, it won’t be because the Yankees pursue him like some lovestruck teenager.

Rangers turn the sort of triple play that has not been done in 106 years

Associated Press
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Triple plays are rare. Triple plays in which only two players touch the ball are even more rare. But last night the Texas Rangers turned a triple play that was even more rare than that. Indeed, it was the sort of triple play that had not been turned since a couple of months after the Titanic sank.

Here’s how it went down:

With the bases loaded and nobody out in the fourth inning, David Fletcher of the Angels hit a sharp one-hopper, fielded by third baseman Jurickson Profar. He stepped on third, getting the runner on second base in a force out. He then quickly tagged Taylor Ward, who had been on third base but had broken, thinking the ball was going to get through, and who froze before figuring out what to do. Profar then threw to Rougned Odor, who stepped on second to force the runner out who had been on first. Watch:

Like a lot of weird triple plays, not everyone was sure what had happened immediately. Odor, for example, had already made the third out when he touched the bag but he still attempted to tag out the runner from first, likely not yet having processed it all. The announcer wasn’t aware of it either. Understandable given how fast it all happened. It took me a couple of times watching it to figure it all out.

The historic part of it: according to STATS, Inc., it was the first triple play in 106 years in which the batter was not retired. The last time it happened: June 3, 1912, turned by the Brooklyn Dodgers against the Cincinnati Reds.