Sano gets work visa after signing with Twins for $3.15 million

Leave a comment

Lost in the Twins’ late-season turnaround, dramatic Game 163 victory, and quick playoff exit is that they made a significant international signing, handing a $3.15 million bonus to a 16-year-old shortstop from the Dominican Republic named Miguel Angel Sano.
Considered by many to be the best international prospect available this year and one of the most advanced hitters to come out of the Dominican Republic in a long time, Sano saw multiple teams end their pursuit once MLB was unable to confirm his age.
Instead of signing along with the rest of this season’s top international prospects in July he waited until late September, choosing the Twins over the Pirates and several other teams. While he ended up with less money than initially expected, the $3.15 million bonus is the second-highest ever given to a Latin American prospect (Cuban defectors excluded) and by far the most Minnesota has ever spent on the international market.
Sano’s contract was contingent upon his receiving a work visa, which some feared would be a major hurdle given the questions surrounding his age, but the government officially issued him one yesterday. Of course, even if everything continues to go smoothly on and off the field he’s obviously a long way from the majors. That risk and a delayed payoff is why investing in international prospects requires a team with some gamble in them.
However, the consensus is that Sano has almost limitless upside offensively, so much so that no one seems to care that he has little shot of sticking at shortstop (or even third base). He’s already 6-foot-3 and 200 pounds, which obviously led to the doubts about his age, but even if Sano is actually 18 or 19 the signing is something that Twins fans should be absolutely thrilled about. Had he been eligible for the draft Sano almost surely would’ve been a first-round pick and perhaps a top-10 selection.
There’s a pretty decent chance that he never ends up making an impact for the Twins, because that’s just how baseball prospects work, but in terms of increasing their likelihood of developing star-caliber players and building championship-caliber teams the Sano signing is a big step in the right direction for a franchise that has generally been risk-averse. And while the $3.15 million bonus is massive in the context of prospect signing bonuses, it’s still less than Nick Punto made this season.

Max Scherzer, with broken nose, strikes out 10 Phillies over seven shutout innings

Patrick Smith/Getty Images
3 Comments

Nationals starter Max Scherzer bunted a ball into his face during batting practice on Tuesday, breaking his nose in the process. He ended up with a gnarly looking shiner around his right eye, making him appear a bit like Terminator. Scherzer still took the ball to start the second game of Wednesday night’s doubleheader against the Phillies.

Despite the injury, Scherzer was incredibly effective, limiting the Phillies to four hits and two walks across seven shutout innings, striking out 10 batters in the process. He might even have had some extra adrenaline going, as he averaged 96.2 MPH on his fastball, his highest average fastball velocity in a game since September 2012, per MLB.com’s Jamal Collier. The Nationals provided Scherzer with just one run of support, coming on a Brian Dozier solo home run off of Jake Arrieta in the second inning, but it was enough.

Wander Suero worked a scoreless top of the eighth with a pair of strikeouts. Victor Robles added a solo homer off of Pat Neshek in the bottom half. Closer Sean Doolittle took over in the ninth, working a 1-2-3 frame to give the Nats their 2-0 victory.

Over his last six starts, Scherzer now has a 0.88 ERA with a 59/8 K/BB ratio across 41 innings. He has gone six innings, struck out at least nine batters, and held the opposition to two or fewer runs in each of those six starts.