Manny hits the showers early

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Is anyone particularly surprised by this?:

When asked prior to Tuesday’s workout how surprised he was to see
Jimmy Rollins beat the Dodgers with a walk-off double into the
right-center gap the night before, Ramirez said he was in the shower at
the time.

“When I came out, they were turning the TVs off and everybody was coming in,” Ramirez said.

Torre gives some quotes suggesting that it was no big deal. Of course, he gave a lot of quotes saying that various things that happened in New York were no big deal too, and we learned otherwise in his book.  I can’t imagine that anyone on the Dodgers appreciates this kind of thing. If the Dodgers won and are up in this series, people chalk this up to Manny being Manny, have a chuckle and move on. But they’re not up. They’re about to be eliminated, and this kind of thing shows total disrespect his teammates.

Not that this is unprecedented.  Remember Rickey Henderson and Bobby Bonilla playing cards for the last three innings of the uber-intense Game 6 of the 1999 NLCS? Their Mets’ teammates were not at all pleased: “Guys who saw (the card game) wanted to take a bat to their heads after
the game . . . There were
players crying and screaming in the dugout (after the Mets lost the
game in 11 innings). Then they walk in the clubhouse and see that?” The difference, based on reports of both incidents is that Henderson and Bonilla were being intentionally defiant, sulking in the locker room because each were displeased with certain decisions made by Bobby Valentine during the NLCS.  Unless something is going on we don’t know about, Manny was just . . . well, I won’t say it.

Probably worth noting that neither Henderson nor Bonilla were on the 2000 Mets following that incident. The only way Ramirez isn’t on the 2010 Dodgers is if he opts out of his deal, which he almost certainly won’t do.  This kind of nonsense, however, is only going to increase the number of people who want him gone. 

B.J. Upton is going by B.J. Upton again

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Outfielder B.J. Upton went by the name B.J., short for Bossman Junior, through the 2014 season. His father Manny was known as Bossman, hence Bossman Junior. Upton decided he wanted to be referred to by his birth name Melvin starting in 2015, saying that everyone except baseball fans knew him by that name. Now, he’s back to B.J., Scott Boeck of USA TODAY Sports reports.

For those keeping score at home, Upton is the artist formerly and currently known as B.J.

Upton, 34, hasn’t played in the majors since 2016. He signed a minor league deal with the Indians in December 2017 but was released in the middle of last March and wasn’t able to latch on with another team. It seems unlikely he finds his way back to the majors.