MLB finds 'no evidence' of Rivera 'spitball'

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As a follow-up to Craig’s article this morning, Joel Sherman of the New York Post reports that MLB “found no evidence that Mariano Rivera spit on the ball” after reviewing video and photos from Game 3 of the ALCS.
Craig already covered just about everything involved in this “story” but my take is that it’s unclear from the video if Rivera was spitting on the baseball or simply near the baseball.
In either case he made zero effort to hide what he was doing, which would obviously be pretty odd if he was, you know, actually attempting to cheat.
Sherman notes that “Rivera is a player who spits constantly while in action” and has never been accused of doctoring a baseball in the past.
In other words, hopefully we’re done with this whole thing, because it’s pretty silly and not nearly as amusing as the last time a star player from New York was accused of spitting. “That is one magic loogy.”
Roger McDowell was unavailable for comment.

Yadier Molina ties record for the most games caught with one team

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Yadier Molina has two World Series rings, multiple Gold Gloves, Platinum Gloves, All-Star appearances and a Silver Slugger award. He now has an all-time record too.

The record: the most games caught with one team. Last night he caught his 1756th career game with the Cardinals, with ties him with Gabby Hartnett of the Cubs, who last caught in 1941 and set the record in 1940, his last season with Chicago. Molina will break the record next time he dons the tools of ignorance, likely tonight against the Phillies.

Given how badly catchers get beaten up — and Molina has taken a beating at times in his career — and given how well mastery of the position leads to a catcher earning journeyman status, as it were, it’s quite a thing to catch that many games for one team.

Given that Molina is under contract with the Cardinals for two more seasons and has stated his desire to retire a Cardinal many times, he’s likely to put that record so far out of reach that it’ll likely take at least another 78 years to break it, if indeed it is ever broken.