Torii Hunter calls out Vlad Guerrero

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Well, not intentionally, but compare this comment from Torii Hunter . . .

It doesn’t matter what you do in the regular season. It’s all about who wants it more. You see guys who hit 30, 40 homers, drive in 100 runs, and they don’t do a thing in postseason. You’ve got pitchers who dominate in the regular season and don’t win in the postseason. It’s the same game, but different. 

With Angel teammate Vlad’s numbers:

162-game average: 36 home runs, 115 RBI

Postseason production: 86 plate appearances, one home run, 7 RBI, .240/.337/.293

So, Torii, you still gonna say it’s about “who wants it more,” or will you admit that, maybe, postseason performance is subject to a lot of random statistical fluctuation that is largely out of a player’s control?

(hat tip for the Vlad comparsion to BTF commenter Shredder who, in addition to knowing the Angels like no one’s business, totally schooled my butt in a fantasy league this year)

Minor League Baseball eclipses 40 million in attendance for 14th consecutive season

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Minor League Baseball announced on Wednesday that, for the 14th consecutive season, the league has eclipsed 40 million in total attendance. 20 teams set single-game attendance records and seven teams set franchise records for single-game attendance in their current parks.

ESPN’s Keith Law, who has been covering the minor leagues for quite a while, did the math:

Minor League Baseball president and CEO Pat O’Conner, whose most prominent stint in the public eye involved him disingenuously justifying the underpaying of his players, said, “Minor League Baseball continues to be the best entertainment value in sports, and these numbers support that. For us to top 40 million fans for the 14th consecutive season despite the weather challenges our teams faced in April and May is a testament to the continued support of our loyal fan bases and the creative promotions and hard work done by all of our teams across the country.”

Major and Minor League Baseball are quite happy to make money hand over fist on the backs of their players, but are too cheap to pay them adequately for their labor.