Major League Baseball (finally) approves the Cubs' sale

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I’m pretty sure that Ron Santo was the starting third baseman when the Ricketts-buying-the-Cubs negotiations started. With the exception of a bankruptcy court’s rubber stamp, however, the process is finally over:

Major League Baseball owners welcomed the Ricketts family to an exclusive fraternity Tuesday, unanimously approving its proposal via conference call to become the owner of  the Cubs . . . The Ricketts family still must clear one more hurdle in bankruptcy court before it can assume day-to-day control of the team. The transaction, valued at $845 million, is expected to be closed by the end of the month.

Whether this will mean anything for the Cubs on the field in the short term is debatable. Rick Morrissey, despite what seems like some wild optimism — “I dare say the Cubs could field the same team next season minus Meltdown Bradley (all right, and Kevin Gregg) and be a factor in the playoffs — thinks that there won’t be a lot of offseason personnel moves. The fact of the matter is that they have a lot of big contracts, one of which — Bradley — they’re probably going to just eat.  Ricketts is a billionaire, and you usually don’t get to be a billionaire by making hasty, public-pleasing decisions.  He’s probably going to stand more or less pat this year and see what he has before tearing things up.

But it is a new day in Chicago, and for that Cubs fans should be happy indeed.

Video: Javier Báez jukes David Freese to avoid tag at first base

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Cubs shortstop Javier Báez pulled off one of the best jukes you’ll see, avoiding the tag from David Freese on a play at first base in the second inning of Tuesday night’s game against the Dodgers. Báez barely made contact with a Kenta Maeda pitch well outside the strike zone, tapping it towards Freese. Báez halted his momentum, juking Freese while he attempted to apply the tag, then dove into first base.

Dodgers manager Dave Roberts attempted to argue that Báez went out of the baseline, but the umpires’ no-call stood and Báez had himself a single. He would end up stranded on base, unfortunately for him and the Cubs.