Padres opt to show Towers the door

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Kevin Towers, the longest tenured GM in baseball, will be let go after 14 years running the show in San Diego, Padres CEO Jeff Moorad confimed Friday night.
The long rumored move will come following a second straight losing season. The Padres have improved from 63-99 in 2008 to 74-85 so far this year, but the second-half surge did Towers no good. The writing had been on the wall since the moment Moorad took control of the team earlier this season.
Despite typically modest payrolls, the Padres won four division titles during Towers’ stay. However, they also finished in fourth or fifth place nine times and lost 95 games on three occasions.
Towers should still be remembered rather fondly in San Diego for the Adrian Gonzalez/Chris Young fleecing of the Rangers. His trades for Phil Nevin, Ryan Klesko and Woody Williams were also big successes, though those teams at the beginning of the decade were failures anyway. His ability to put together quality bullpens, that were always very cheap outside of Trevor Hoffman, had to be one factor that gave Moores pause before he decided to let him go.
But, in the end, player development problems doomed Towers. In my Restoring the Rosters series in August, I ranked the Padres 28th in talent signed. Of the 28 first- and supplemental first-round picks to come on board during Towers’ tenure, only one, Khalil Greene, has turned into a quality major leaguer. Now, it’s still too early to judge those last 10, all of whom have been drafted since 2007, and Tim Stauffer is recently showing signs of life, but that’s an abysmal track record.
The Padres need some new blood, so they’ll look outside of the organization for a successor. Jerry DiPoto and Peter Woodfork, both of whom worked with Moorad in Arizona, seem like logical choices. DiPoto has been a hot name the last couple of years anyway, and he should be considered the favorite for the job,

Vanderbilt defeats Michigan 8-2 to win College World Series

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Vanderbilt defeated Michigan 8-2 in a decisive Game 3 on Wednesday night to win the College World Series. It’s Vanderbilt’s first championship since 2014 when the school defeated Virginia 3-2. Surprisingly, the 10 combined runs made this the highest-scoring College World Series-clinching game since 2009 when LSU beat Texas 11-4.

Michigan got on the board early, beginning the top of the first with three consecutive singles to take a 1-0 lead. Vanderbilt tied it at 1-1 with a solo homer from Pat DeMarco.

Vanderbilt took control of the game in the third and fourth innings, scoring three and two times, respectively. In the third, DeMarco drew a bases loaded walk and Stephen Scott followed up with a two-run single to make it 4-1. In the fourth, Vandy got a run on an RBI single from J.J. Bleday and a sacrifice fly from Ethan Paul. Harrison Ray added an RBI single in the seventh to pad the lead to 7-1. After Michigan scratched out another run in the top of the eighth, Vanderbilt got it right back in the bottom half thanks to an RBI single by Philip Clarke.

On the pitching side of things, Mason Hickman delivered six strong innings for Vandy. He yielded the lone run on four hits and three walks while striking out 10. He gave way to Jake Eder in the seventh, who worked a 1-2-3 frame. Eder remained in the game for the eighth, relenting a run on a two-out double, but it was too little, too late for Michigan. Going out in the ninth inning for a third inning, Eder worked around a two-out walk to close out the ballgame in an 8-2 victory for Vanderbilt.