Juan Uribe is catnip to Brian Sabean: the Giants should pass on both of them

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It happens almost every year: the Giants, for reasons clear only to them, sign some 30 year-old (or older) hitter to a silly contract based on a career year and some pie-in-the-sky sense that he’ll do it again. The candidate for 2010: Juan Uribe:

There exists a player who sounds as though he wants to be a Giant next
year. This year, he is hitting .299 in 378 at-bats. Project his numbers
over 500 at-bats and he would have 20 homers and 70 RBIs.

His on-base-plus-slugging percentage (OPS) as an everyday player since
Aug. 1 is 1.011. To put that in context, the only National Leaguers
over 1.000 for the entire season are Albert Pujols and Prince Fielder.
He is a favorite among fans and teammates.

I’ll pass on the Pujols/Fielder comparison because I’m trying to give up my ducks-in-a-barrel addiction and simply note that Uribe is putting up numbers like nothing he’s done in his nine seasons in Major League Baseball. Seriously, his OBP over the past four seasons has been .296, .284, .257, and .301. His lifetime OBP is .299. By any measure, by any way you slice and dice it, his current season is the very definition of a fluke. He has a touch of pop in his bat and can play two or three positions so he has some use as a utility guy, but he’s not the sort of dude you make a point of going after in the offseason.

Like Uribe, Giant GM Brian Sabean’s contract is up after the season. The fact that a 30 year-old fluke is sitting out there, just waiting to be given a $5M+ salary by Sabes is reason enough to find a new general manager.

Report: Welington Castillo to be suspended 80 games for violating Joint Drug Agreement

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Ken Rosenthal of The Athletic confirms a report from journalist Américo Celado that White Sox catcher Welington Castillo will be suspended 80 games for violating baseball’s Joint Drug Agreement. Castillo was believed to have used a steroid, but according to Rosenthal, the substance was not a steroid. More details should come on Thursday.

Castillo, 31, entered Wednesday’s action batting .270/.314/.477 with six home runs and 15 RBI in 118 plate appearances. He has gotten the bulk of the work behind the plate, backed up by Omar Narváez.

Castillo’s absence will likely prompt the White Sox to call up Kevan Smith from Triple-A Charlotte. Smith battled an ankle injury in March and April, so he got a late start to the season. In 102 PA at Triple-A, he has hit .283/.343/.457.