Juan Uribe is catnip to Brian Sabean: the Giants should pass on both of them

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It happens almost every year: the Giants, for reasons clear only to them, sign some 30 year-old (or older) hitter to a silly contract based on a career year and some pie-in-the-sky sense that he’ll do it again. The candidate for 2010: Juan Uribe:

There exists a player who sounds as though he wants to be a Giant next
year. This year, he is hitting .299 in 378 at-bats. Project his numbers
over 500 at-bats and he would have 20 homers and 70 RBIs.

His on-base-plus-slugging percentage (OPS) as an everyday player since
Aug. 1 is 1.011. To put that in context, the only National Leaguers
over 1.000 for the entire season are Albert Pujols and Prince Fielder.
He is a favorite among fans and teammates.

I’ll pass on the Pujols/Fielder comparison because I’m trying to give up my ducks-in-a-barrel addiction and simply note that Uribe is putting up numbers like nothing he’s done in his nine seasons in Major League Baseball. Seriously, his OBP over the past four seasons has been .296, .284, .257, and .301. His lifetime OBP is .299. By any measure, by any way you slice and dice it, his current season is the very definition of a fluke. He has a touch of pop in his bat and can play two or three positions so he has some use as a utility guy, but he’s not the sort of dude you make a point of going after in the offseason.

Like Uribe, Giant GM Brian Sabean’s contract is up after the season. The fact that a 30 year-old fluke is sitting out there, just waiting to be given a $5M+ salary by Sabes is reason enough to find a new general manager.

Noah Syndergaard to disabled list due to hand, foot, and mouth disease

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MLB.com’s Anthony DiComo reports that Mets starter Noah Syndergaard will be placed on the 10-day disabled list because he contracted hand, foot, and mouth disease. The ailment is more common in children than adults and is caused by Coxsackievirus A16 or Enterovirus 71. According to James Wagner of the New York Times, it is believed that Syndergaard picked up hand, foot, and mouth disease working at a youth camp during the All-Star break.

Syndergaard, 25, started on Friday. He pitched well but lasted only five innings, throwing 84 pitches, because he had diminished velocity and felt tired. He yielded a run on eight hits with no walks and four strikeouts. It was his second start since returning from a DL stint (strained ligament in right index finger) that kept him out between May 26 and July 12.

The Mets expect Syndergaard to need only the minimum 10 days to recover. Corey Oswalt will temporarily take Syndergaard’s spot in the rotation.

In 13 starts this season, Syndergaard owns a 2.89 ERA with 83 strikeouts and 15 walks in 74 2/3 innings.