Despite the ugliness in Pittsburgh, John Russell's job is safe

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So says Dejan Kovacevic:

Team president Frank Coonelly and general manager Neal Huntington each affirmed, in unambiguous terms, that they want Russell and his staff back. Within the past week, each simply answered, “No,” when asked if there had been any change in how they feel. Neither elaborated because neither sees Russell or the staff as an issue and, moreover, they like what they have seen of the team’s motivation and instruction over the full season.

This probably makes sense. I’m no Russell fan, but there’s no question that he’s finishing the season with a radically different team than the one he started with. To the extent there was clubhouse dissent this summer it was understandable, albeit misguided dissent in the fallout of necessary, albeit depressing trades.  That stuff happens.

The Pirates have been losing all year and are in a death spiral at the moment, but there’s not a poisonous atmosphere surrounding this team like there was around the Cecil Cooper Astros, and there’s not the stink of massively squandered potential like that wafting off of the Eric Wedge Indians.

Firing Russell would be temporarily cathartic, but ultimately pointless.  The Pirates aren’t going to win with a better manager. They’re going to win with better players.  And at present, there’s no reason to believe that John Russell isn’t the guy to lead them if those better players ever happen along.

Marlins home run sculpture is going, going, gone!

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Not long after the new ownership group bought the Miami Marlins, face of the franchise Derek Jeter made it clear that he wanted the home runs sculpture beyond the outfield fence gone. He simply doesn’t like it aesthetically and many think that, among Jeter’s goals, he’d like to erase any trace of Jeff Loria’s legacy, which includes the sculpture.

The problem: the sculpture is not Jeter’s to remove. The sculpture is public property, purchased as part of the Art in Public Places program, which requires art to be installed for the public in county-owned buildings, which includes Marlins Park. Miami-Dade officials have said that moving it was not possible as the sculpture was “not moveable” and was “permanently installed: as it was designed specifically for Marlins Park. And that’s before you get into how logistically complicated it would be to move it. It’s seven stories tall and is connected to a hydraulic system, plumbing and there’s electricity.

What Jeter wants, however, Jeter eventually gets. From the Miami Herald:

The Miami Marlins won county permission on Tuesday to move its home-run sculpture out of Marlins Park to the plaza outside . . . In its new location outside, “Homer” will still turn on for home runs, as well as at the end of every home win and every day at 3:05 p.m., an homage to Miami’s original area code.

It may or may not be moved before Opening Day, but once it is moved there will be a new seating and standing room only area for spectators where the sculpture currently sits.