The White Sox retain their entire coaching staff but put their players on notice

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Kenny Williams is keeping things level going forward by re-signing the entire White Sox staff through 2011.  Which makes perfect sense to me, no matter how much of a bummer 2009 ended up being for the Sox. As Williams said, “at the end of the day, it’s the players that make you look smart or make you look dumb, and right now we’re all not looking too smart.”   

But while Williams is unwilling to make scapegoats out of his coaches, he’s got no problem with throwing his players under the bus:

”I know who’s quit and who hasn’t, who’s willing to sacrifice. It’s hard to win. Winning and success, whether it be baseball or any other facet of life, if you are not willing to sacrifice, you’re not willing to put in the work, you’re not going to be successful. You’re just not. … If you are not willing to do that, I can’t have you here and I will send you to a better place for you.”

Williams wouldn’t name the alleged quitters’ names, but did say “I am certainly looking at it very hard and see who is willing to make the sacrifice to win.”

The fact is, the failure of players to “sacrifice” is not the White Sox’ problem. The guys they have are basically performing as you’d expect them to perform. The problem is that they simply don’t have a ton of good players, and no real superstars to speak of.

Usually, the blame for a lack of good players falls on the general manager.  Rather than own up to that, Williams is trying to turn the White Sox 2009 story into one in which his team, or at least part of it, quit.  Maybe a diehard southsider has a different opinion, but my take of the Sox this year doesn’t bear Williams’ view out at all. 

Minor League Baseball eclipses 40 million in attendance for 14th consecutive season

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Minor League Baseball announced on Wednesday that, for the 14th consecutive season, the league has eclipsed 40 million in total attendance. 20 teams set single-game attendance records and seven teams set franchise records for single-game attendance in their current parks.

ESPN’s Keith Law, who has been covering the minor leagues for quite a while, did the math:

Minor League Baseball president and CEO Pat O’Conner, whose most prominent stint in the public eye involved him disingenuously justifying the underpaying of his players, said, “Minor League Baseball continues to be the best entertainment value in sports, and these numbers support that. For us to top 40 million fans for the 14th consecutive season despite the weather challenges our teams faced in April and May is a testament to the continued support of our loyal fan bases and the creative promotions and hard work done by all of our teams across the country.”

Major and Minor League Baseball are quite happy to make money hand over fist on the backs of their players, but are too cheap to pay them adequately for their labor.