Bradley's mom blames preschool racism, Mark De Rosa-love for Milton's troubles

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On at least one level I feel sorry for Milton Bradley, and that has to do with his mom, who simply won’t stop talking to the Chicago media about her son.

The latest? According to her, Bradley was distracted because his three year-old son was subjected to racist taunts. “Parents, teachers and their kids called him the n-word,” she said.  Tough preschool.  Also, says Ma Bradley, the fans hated him right off the bat because he wasn’t Mark DeRosa. “And he could see right away the fans didn’t accept him because they
wanted DeRosa, I think his name was, to be there. So he never really
felt accepted. He never felt comfortable at all.” Oh, and she also says that Bradley would like to play in Chicago again if given the chance.

I feel sorry for him because I could totally see my mom doing this. Except instead of racist toddlers and DeRosa envy, my mom would blame all of my struggles on gas or “a change in the weather,” which are the two things she has blamed for every bit of negativity that has happened in her lifetime, be it the space shuttle exploding, inflation, or the Kennedy assassination.

I’d say I can’t wait to hear more from Bradley’s mom, but my guess is that Milton is going to spend a good bit of time today arranging for her phone number to be changed.

There is a “one million percent” chance Aroldis Champan will opt-out of his deal

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Ken Rosenthal of The Athletic reports that there is a “one million percent” chance Yankees closer Aroldis Chapman will opt out once the season ends.

Just going by the math this makes perfect sense, of course.

Chapman signed a five-year, $86 million deal with the Yankees before the 2017 season. Pursuant to the terms of the deal he’ll make $15 million a year in 2020 and 2021 (he was given an $11 million signing bonus that was finished being paid out last year). This past season the qualifying offer was $17.9 million. Craig Kimbrel of the Cubs just signed a deal that will pay him $16 million in 2020, 2021, and 2022 (he’s making a prorated $16 million this year). Other top closer salaries at the moment include Kenley Jansen ($19,333,334); and Wade Davis ($18 million).

It’s fair to say that Chapman fits into that group and, I think it’s safe to say, more teams would take him than those guys if they were all freely available. As such, Chapman opting out to get more money makes all kinds of sense. Heck, opting out, getting slapped with a qualifying offer, accepting it and then hitting the market unencumbered after the 2020 season would stand him in better financial stead than if he didn’t opt-out in the first place.

The question is whether the Yankees will let it get that far or whether they’ll approach him to renegotiate the final couple of years on the deal or to add some years onto the back of it. If they’re smart they will.