Sox-Angels ump admits to being fooled; poor judgment; and making makeup calls

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Yesterday we debated whether or not umpires react to crowd noise and stuff like that. Today comes evidence that other subjective factors color their calls as well:


Umpire
Rick Reed acknowledged Thursday that his ball-four call on a
ninth-inning pitch by Angels closer Brian Fuentes to Nick Green on
Wednesday night “very well could have been a strike” . . . Reed said that on that final pitch to Green, Mike Napoli’s actions led
him to call it a ball after the Angels catcher tried to frame the
knee-high pitch . . . “The catcher did a nice job of bringing it up,
and that was a telling blow. If a catcher moves his glove, it’s to
improve the pitch.”

Anyone who has watched a lot of baseball knows this on some level, but it is odd to hear an umpire acknowledge that the catcher’s framing of the pitch and body language actually influences the call so directly.  Here’s some more evidence that the old conventional wisdom regarding umpires is true:

“I called a [strike] earlier in the game that I thought was low, and I
said, ‘I’m not going to let that happen again.’ I wish they were all
waist-high. They’d be a lot easier to judge.”

The old makeup call. Something umps — and football refs — claim never occurs. Again, we all knew it, but it’s quite a thing to hear an umpire admit it.

Video: Nolan Arenado collects 200th career home run

Nolan Arenado
AP Images
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The Rockies fell 9-6 to the Orioles on Saturday, but the loss wasn’t without its bright spots. Case in point: Third baseman Nolan Arenado passed a significant career milestone on an Andrew Cashner fastball in the third inning, slugging the ball a projected 394 feet into the left field stands for his 200th career home run.

Arenado is the 34th active player to join the 200+ homer club and the first to do so since the Braves’ Freddie Freeman crossed that threshold on May 19. The three-run shot was the infielder’s 14th of the season and third since Friday, when he went deep twice against Orioles rookie John Means and reliever Shawn Armstrong. Following Saturday’s performance, he’s batting a robust .333/.377/.632 with 30 extra-base hits, 42 RBI, and a 1.009 OPS through 220 plate appearances.

He isn’t the only Rockies slugger making history, either. Arenado’s feat trailed that of Trevor Story, who clobbered an 0-2 pitch from Armstrong during the seventh inning of Friday’s 8-6 win. The two-run blast was his 100th home run in 448 career games, making him the fastest shortstop to reach the mark in MLB history.

The Rockies will vie for the series win as they round out the series on Sunday, with right-hander German Márquez scheduled to take the bump against fellow righty David Hess at 3:10 PM EDT.