Just take your base, Jorge

Leave a comment

posada_090915.jpgTake your base Jorge. Just take your base.

That’s what you do when a pitcher throws a pitch behind you. A pitcher on a team that is not going to come anywhere near sniffing the playoffs.

Yes, Jesse Carlson threw that ball near your backside on purpose (somehow he missed). He was trying to hit you. He was trying to defend the honor of Edwin Encarnacion and Aaron Hill, who were nailed by pitches thrown by Yankee pitchers.

It doesn’t matter if Encarnacion and Hill were hit on purpose or on accident. When a couple guys on one team get hit, a guy on your team is probably going to get hit (or at least thrown at) in response. That’s how it works in baseball.

And after more than 1,500 games played at the big league level, I’m surprised you didn’t know that. If you need a refresher course on how these things work, read this. I promise you it’s gold.

Instead of taking your base after drawing that walk, you had words with Carlson. That’s fine. But when you came around to score a meaningless run in this Toronto blowout, you decided to toss a wayward elbow Carlson’s direction as he covered home. You’re lucky no one was injured in the wild melee that ensued. A concussion for Jeter? A strained muscle for Teixeira? A bruised rib for Sabathia? It wouldn’t take much.

I’m not terribly worried about the possible suspension you’re facing. It would take an incredible run for the Red Sox to catch your Yankees now. But still, next time? Just take your base. Or at least listen to Cito Gaston:

“I don’t know if that was too smart. They have a lot more to lose than we do.”

Amen.

******

If you Twitter, and are in a fighting mood, follow me at @Bharks.

Twins reach historic home run total during 11-4 rout of White Sox

Max Kepler
AP Images
3 Comments

The Twins trampled the White Sox on Friday night, cruising to a cool 11-4 lead over their division rivals and collecting their sixth double-digit win of 2019. Even more impressive, they picked up their 99th, 100th, and 101st home runs, a feat that’s rarely been matched in a team’s first 50 games of any given season.

The first homer of the night was delivered by Eddie Rosario in the third inning. Working against a single-run deficit, Rosario lifted an 0-1 fastball from the White Sox’ Reynaldo López, planting it firmly in the left field stands and evening the score, 4-4. Two batters later, Rosario’s solo home run got a sequel: a 398-footer from Miguel Sanó, this one postmarked for the upper deck in left.

In the fourth, now leading 5-4, the Twins saw a third and final homer from the bat of Max Kepler, whose center-field blast traveled a projected 397 feet to give the club a two-run advantage. Per MLB Stats, the Twins’ record — 101 homers in 50 games — stands second only to that of the 1999 Mariners, who managed to club 102 home runs before their 51st game of the season.

While the record has undoubtedly been a team effort, Rosario leads the pack with a team-best 15 homers so far this year, closely followed by C.J. Cron (13), Max Kepler (11), and Jonathan Schoop (10). Sanó, whose solo shot marked the team’s 100th home run of 2019, has just five, though there’s little doubt he’ll reach double digits before the end of the season.

According to MLB.com’s Do-Hyoung Park, the Twins also made it to an even 300 runs scored in 2019, for a satisfying average of six runs per game and a new franchise record (previous high mark: 273 runs scored in 1992). With the win, they improved to 34-16 on the year and continue to hold a comfortable eight-game lead in the AL Central.