They may be bad, but the A's aren't 'playing softball' any more

Leave a comment

Just because Ken Tremendous and company have hung up their keyboards, I’ll give this a shot. During his weekly chat session on ESPN.com this morning Joe Morgan responded to a question asking, “What do the Oakland A’s need to do be competitive again?”

Become more athletic. Sometimes, when I look at the A’s players, I think they’re playing softball. They have some big guys who try to hit the ball out of the ballpark. They strike out a lot. They just are not in position to make things happen on the basepaths. They’ve never really been a team to run or steal bases, bunt guys over or hit and run. They’ve always tried to hit the big home run.

Oakland stinks, there’s no doubt about that, but the A’s have hit the fewest home runs in the entire league while stealing the fourth-most bases. They also rank in the middle of the pack in strikeouts and sacrifice bunts. There are all kinds of legitimate criticisms that can be lobbed at Billy Beane and the A’s, but the notion that they’re still “playing softball” isn’t really one of them. If anything, getting so far away from that approach has probably hurt them.

Cody Bellinger named NLCS MVP

Cody Bellinger
AP Images
1 Comment

Following a dominant 5-1 win to clinch the National League Championship Series on Saturday night, the Dodgers named outfielder Cody Bellinger their MVP of the series.

Bellinger, 23, made noise when it mattered. Entering Saturday’s game, he carried a meager .190/.227/.238 batting line with just four hits and two RBI, but his hits in Games 4 and 7 became the difference-makers the Dodgers needed to keep pace with the Brewers and clinch the NL pennant. In Game 4, it was Bellinger’s 13th-inning base hit off of Junior Guerra that put the Dodgers over the top for the walk-off 2-1 win. The outfielder returned to put the finishing touches on the series with a go-ahead home run — his first of the postseason — in the second inning of Game 7.

Bellinger wrapped his second season in the Dodgers’ organization in 2018, slashing .260/.343/.470 with 25 home runs, an .814 OPS, and 3.6 fWAR across 632 PA and all 162 games. He’s the youngest Dodgers player to receive the award to date.