A look at the Mets' power drought

Leave a comment

In a world where Daniel Murphy
(nine) has more home runs than David Wright (eight) in less at-bats,
you know something is screwy with the Mets this season.




Team home runs:



26) Oakland – 116

27) Houston – 115

28) Pittsburgh – 109

29) San Francisco – 99

30) New York (NL) – 81



Yeah, it’s that bad. I’m no
prognosticator, but if you were to project the Mets’ current pace, they
would finish with roughly 96 home runs, their lowest tally since they
hit just 93 in 1992. Bobby Bonilla (19), Eddie Murray (16) and Darryl Boston
(13) were the only ones to make it to double-digits on that squad.




As the current Mets enter play on
Tuesday, Gary Sheffield leads the team with just 10 home runs. And he
probably won’t even play again this season
. Just for comparison’s sake,
the Rockies and Yankees have eight players with 10 home runs or more.

Minor League Baseball eclipses 40 million in attendance for 14th consecutive season

Sara D. Davis/Getty Images
4 Comments

Minor League Baseball announced on Wednesday that, for the 14th consecutive season, the league has eclipsed 40 million in total attendance. 20 teams set single-game attendance records and seven teams set franchise records for single-game attendance in their current parks.

ESPN’s Keith Law, who has been covering the minor leagues for quite a while, did the math:

Minor League Baseball president and CEO Pat O’Conner, whose most prominent stint in the public eye involved him disingenuously justifying the underpaying of his players, said, “Minor League Baseball continues to be the best entertainment value in sports, and these numbers support that. For us to top 40 million fans for the 14th consecutive season despite the weather challenges our teams faced in April and May is a testament to the continued support of our loyal fan bases and the creative promotions and hard work done by all of our teams across the country.”

Major and Minor League Baseball are quite happy to make money hand over fist on the backs of their players, but are too cheap to pay them adequately for their labor.