Restoring the rosters: No. 4 – Philadelphia

Leave a comment

This is part of a series of articles examining what every team’s roster would look like if given only the players it originally signed. I’m compiling the rosters, ranking them and presenting them in a countdown from Nos. 30 to 1.
No. 30 – Cincinnati
No. 29 – Kansas City
No. 28 – San Diego
No. 27 – Milwaukee
No. 26 – Baltimore
No. 25 – Chicago (AL)
No. 24 – Chicago (NL)
No. 23 – Pittsburgh
No. 22 – Detroit
No. 21 – Tampa Bay
No. 20 – New York (NL)
No. 19 – Houston
No. 18 – Oakland
No. 17 – St. Louis
No. 16 – Florida
No. 15 – San Francisco
No. 14 – Texas
No. 13 – Cleveland
No. 12 – Minnesota
No. 11 – Arizona
No. 10 – Los Angeles (AL)
No. 9 – Toronto
No. 8 – Boston
No. 7 – Colorado
No. 6 – Montreal/Washington
No. 5 – New York (AL)
Here’s the only team in the top seven of these rankings to have won a World Series in the past eight years. On the strength of an outstanding infield still mostly intact, the Phillies come in at No. 4.
Rotation
Cole Hamels
Randy Wolf
Gavin Floyd
J.A. Happ
Josh Outman
Bullpen
Brett Myers
Ryan Madson
Taylor Buchholz
Brad Ziegler
Carlos Silva
Geoff Geary
Antonio Bastardo
Maybe it’s more solid than spectacular, but it’s a fine staff. Figuring that Myers would make the bullpen stronger in the closer’s role, I chose to go with Outman as the fifth starter based on how impressive he was for the A’s before requiring Tommy John surgery this year. He had a 3.48 ERA in 12 starts and two relief appearances before going down.
It is worth noting that there’s not much depth here to cover for injuries. Carlos Carrasco was next in line for a rotation spot, but once past him, the options dwindle to names like Kyle Kendrick, Andrew Carpenter and Adam Eaton.
Lineup
CF Michael Bourn
2B Chase Utley
SS Jimmy Rollins
1B Ryan Howard
3B Scott Rolen
LF Pat Burrell
RF Marlon Byrd
C Carlos Ruiz
Bench
INF Jason Donald
INF Nick Punto
C Lou Marson
OF Jason Michaels
OF Greg Golson
Again, depth is an issue here. The only two experienced reserves are Punto and Michaels, and neither is very valuable. If an injury struck the outfield, top prospect Michael Taylor would be the best option to move into the starting lineup.
The lineup is plenty strong, though, and the up-the-middle defense is outstanding. I especially like the fact that Rollins and Rolen will be starting on the left side of the infield behind four left-handed starting pitchers.
Summary
The Phillies minor league system has long had a reputation for being shallow and yet producing stars, and that’s exactly what we see here. The squad has a fine rotation and lineup, but little behind it. Still, the club has come up with a greater quantity of prospects in recent years, which explains just how it managed to satisfy the Indians’ needs and acquire Cliff Lee while retaining Happ, Kyle Drabek, Taylor and Dominic Brown. I’m confident that the Phillies will place right around here again when these rankings are revisited a couple of years down the road.

Reds having Michael Lorenzen prepare as a two-way player

Dylan Buell/Getty Images
Leave a comment

For decades, a legitimate “two-way player” — a player who functions as both a pitcher and as a position player — was nothing but a fantasy. The skill sets required for both are too distinct and require too much prep work, it was thought. The Angels’ Shohei Ohtani shattered that illusion in 2018, posting a .925 OPS in 367 plate appearances as a hitter while posting a 3.31 ERA in 51 2/3 innings as a pitcher.

Since then, several more players have been considered in two-way roles. The Rangers signed Matt Davidson earlier this month and could potentially use him as a corner infielder as well as a reliever. Also earlier this month, James Loney signed with the independent Atlantic League’s Sugar Land Skeeters, who plan to use him as both a first baseman and as a pitcher.

You can add Michael Lorenzen of the Reds to that list. MLB.com’s Mark Sheldon reports that the Reds will have Lorenzen prepare this spring as a two-way player. He could both start and relieve while occasionally playing in the outfield. Lorenzen, in fact, took batting practice with the outfielders on Thursday. Previously, he had taken batting practice as extra work following a workout with fellow pitchers.

Lorenzen said, “It’s fantastic, the effort they’re putting in. A lot of the excuses were, ‘You know, we don’t want to overwork him.’ Well, let’s just sit down and talk about it then. They were willing to sit down and talk about it, which is one of the reasons why I love this staff so much and why I think the front office did a great job [hiring] this staff. They’re willing to find solutions for problems.”

New manager David Bell said, “We’ve put together a plan for the whole spring, knowing we can adjust it at any time. We didn’t want to go into each day not knowing what he’s going to do. We all felt better, he did, too. He was part of putting it together.”

Lorenzen, 27, pitched 81 innings last year with a 3.11 ERA and a 54/34 K/BB ratio. He’s one of baseball’s best-hitting pitchers as well. Last year, he swatted four homers and knocked in 10 runs in 34 trips to the plate. The last pitcher to hit at least four homers in a season was the Giants’ Madison Bumgarner, who did it in both 2014 (four) and 2015 (five). Lorenzen also posted a 1.043 OPS. According to Baseball Reference, there have been only 11 pitchers to OPS over 1.000 (min. 30 PA). The only ones to do it in the 2000’s are Lorenzen last year, Micah Owings in 2007 (1.033) and Dontrelle Willis in 2011 (1.032).