And That Happened: Tuesday's scores and highlights

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Phillies 1, Giants 0: Philadelphia was cruising before Cole Hamels woke up. Now they’re positively terrifying. Two hitter. Nine Ks. Dear God.

Braves 4 Marlins 3: Tim Hudson is back, pitched well, etc. etc.
OK, with that out of the way, let’s get down to brass tax. This from
reader Matt H.:

The SportSouth broadcast of the Braves-Marlins tonight
showed the jumbotron at Landshark Stadium while Omar Infante was at
bat. In the foreground was the obligatory head shot, with his name and
number. In the background was–I kid you not–a picture of the General
Lee in mid-jump. Yes, that General Lee. I am as big a Braves fan as
there is, and I have no idea why the Marlins put that graphic up. Is
slick and sophisticated Miami poking fun at backwoods Georgia? That
doesn’t make sense, since any linkage of the General Lee with the
Braves is a net win for the Braves.

Seriously. Was that supposed to be a slam? Why don’t you just call the
Braves handsome and give them some free pie while you’re at it, because
there is nothing cooler than being associated with The General Lee.
Maybe the Bandit’s Trans-Am. Maybe.

Tigers 8, Indians 5: Aubrey Huff was 2-2 with 3 RBI. Sadly,
David Huff did not pitch for the Tribe or else I’d be forced to go
Groucho for the second time this year. Cleveland gave up 13 hits and
walked six guys and that lead to the loss. A child of five would
understand this. Quick, send someone to fetch a child of five. Carlos
Carrasco was called up from my hometown of Columbus to pitch in this
disaster. You’re a brave man, Carlos. And remember, while you were out
there risking your life and limb through shot and shell, we were all in
here thinking what a sucker you are. Oh crap, I did it again.

Twins 4, White Sox 3: The White Sox lose. They were probably
discombobulated from having the team’s average age plummet by eight
years since Monday night’s trades. Jeff Manship gave up one run over
five innings. He didn’t figure in the decision, but boy howdy do I like
to say “Manship.”

Cardinals 7, Brewers 6: Joel Pineiro is the only dude in
baseball who can get away with striking out no one. St. Louis is 30-4
since July 1st in starts by Wainwright, Carpenter and Pineiro. I
predict one awesome NLCS, assuming we can dispose of L.A. and whoever wins the wild card quickly enough.

Rangers 5, Blue Jays 2; Rangers 5, Blue Jays 2: Fill my eyes with that double vision. No disguise for that double vision.

Cubs 4, Astros 1: In the fifth, Jeff Baker hit what appeared to
be an inning-ending double play, but Miguel Tejada made an errant throw
to second, allowing Soriano to advance to third. I had no idea that
Baker was from the Dominican Republic.

Red Sox 8, Rays 4: The return of Andy Sonnanstine was less than
fabulous (4 IP, 8 H, 5 R), and I think it’s gettin’ time to bid adieu
to the Rays in 2009. Papelbon pulled a Gossage and pitched a two-inning
save. Then he grew a ridiculous mustache and went on a rant about
pitchers today are wusses.


Reds 11, Pirates 5: Game story: “Pittsburgh is four defeats shy
of becoming the first major American professional team to string
together 17 straight losing seasons.” What happens first: the Pirates
break .500, or Sid Bream dies of old age?

Rockies 8, Mets 3: Lance Broadway pitches two scoreless innings
in relief for the Mets. In other news, “Lance Broadway” was the name I
used on vacations to Las Vegas between the years 1996 and 2002.

Yankees 9, Orioles 6: Two homers for Posada and another shaky performance from Burnett that is likely to fly under the radar.
According to the game story, Posada lost track of the count twice. The
second time he hit a homer after mistakenly thinking he struck out.
You’d think that a catcher of all people wouldn’t lose track of the
count.

Dodgers 4, Diamondbacks 3: Matt Kemp homered for the fourth
straight game. The last Dodger to do that was Hee Seop Choi so, you
know, heady company. A spectacular catch by Andre Ethier in the eighth
inning followed his bases-loaded walk in the seventh which brought in
the winning run.

Royals 4, Athletics 3: The A’s had their chances, but they stranded 11, going 1 for 10 with men in scoring position.

Padres 4, Nationals 1: I’m guessing no one outside of Padre or
National Nation knew this, but apparently the Padres have owned the
Nationals over the years, having gone 30-9 against them since they
ceased to be the Expos.

Mariners 2, Angels 1: A week or so ago Ken Griffey, being
interviewed by a Cincinnati magazine, said that he was going to make it
so that music from “The Nutcracker” played when Adrian Beltre returned
from his injured testicle stint on the DL. I thought that was harsh and
I didn’t think he’d actually do it, but I’ll be damned if he didn’t in
this game. I think something about that should make up the final line
on his Hall of Fame plaque.


Brewers hold off the Dodgers to force Game 7 of the NLCS

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Down 3-2 in the NLCS, the Brewers faced a must-win situation during Game 6 on Friday. Any residual uncertainty they might have felt about their chances of extending the series was all but resolved in the first inning, however, when Jesús Aguilar, Mike Moustakas, and Erik Kratz combined for a four-run spread to take an early lead. Powered by those early-game RBI, as well as masterful performances from Wade Miley, Corey Knebel, and Corbin Burnes, the club surged to a 7-2 win to pull even with the Dodgers and force a Game 7 tiebreaker.

Left-hander Wade Miley trounced the Dodgers in 4 1/3 innings of two-run, four-strikeout ball. He was bested by David Freese in the very first at-bat of the night, which culminated with a 402-footer to right field to put Los Angeles on the board, 1-0. After a few scoreless innings from the Dodgers, Freese returned to torment Miley in the top of the fifth, this time with an RBI double that narrowed the Brewers’ advantage from four runs to three.

Things didn’t go nearly as smoothly for opposing lefty Hyun-Jin Ryu. In the bottom of the first inning, Ryu allowed a leadoff single to Lorenzo Cain, followed by a four-pitch walk to Ryan Braun. Jesús Aguilar came up to bat with two out and two on, then smacked a two-RBI line drive double to right field. Moustakas and Kratz went back-to-back-to-back with Aguilar, putting up another three runs on an RBI double and single, respectively.

The Brewers kept rolling in the second inning. Christian Yelich and Braun each collected a double off of Ryu, bringing Milwaukee’s lead to 5-1 over Los Angeles. Braun advanced to third on a Travis Shaw groundout, but with Aguilar up to bat, Ryu wasn’t going to chance a repeat of the Dodgers’ first-inning debacle. He intentionally walked Aguilar, then whiffed Moustakas on three straight fastballs to cap the inning.

By the time both Miley and Ryu were forced from the mound, the Brewers stood 5-2 above their opponents. Right-hander Corey Knebel worked a scoreless 1 2/3 innings, striking out Manny Machado to eliminate another potential rally from the Dodgers in the fifth inning and retiring all four batters in the sixth (save for Joc Pederson, who reached base after taking a 96.3-MPH fastball to the wrist). The righty received another significant opportunity to do some damage against the Dodgers in the bottom of the fifth, when he came up to bat for the first time in his professional career with the bases loaded and two outs… but saw just four pitches before swinging at a 1-2 pitch to end the inning.

After Ryu’s unexpected departure in the third, Dodgers skipper Dave Roberts cycled through five pitchers — Julio Urías, Alex Wood, Dylan Floro, Caleb Ferguson, and Kenta Maeda — in an attempt to squelch the Brewers’ comeback. The bullpen combined for four consecutive scoreless frames, but was ultimately foiled in the seventh, when, with runners on second and third and two outs, a wild pitch from Maeda ricocheted off the front of home plate and allowed Aguilar to plate yet another insurance run. Still not content with a two-hit, two-RBI performance, Aguilar came back in the bottom of the eighth with an RBI single — only moments after a failed double play that would have ended the inning — to bring the Brewers to a cushy 7-2 advantage as they entered the ninth.

No similar last-minute rallies awaited the Dodgers there. Rookie right-hander Corbin Burnes orchestrated another flawless 1-2-3 inning in the ninth, retiring Pederson and Puig with consecutive strikeouts and inducing a game-inning, series-extending pop-up from Matt Kemp to wrap the win.

Game 7 is set for 8:09 PM EDT on Saturday. The starters for both clubs have yet to be announced.