Act now to get your David Wright helmet protector

Leave a comment

wright_huge_helmet_090901.jpgAs if the Mets’ season hasn’t been bad enough, now even David Wright has become a laughingstock — through no fault of his own.

On Tuesday night, Wright made his return from the disabled list, where he had landed after taking a Matt Cain fastball to the noggin.

The incident was frightening, so precautions were taken to protect the cranium of New York’s star third baseman in the form of a giant batting helmet.

Remember the old commercial from Saturday Night Live featuring the “Gary Busey helmet protector,” which was a large foam covering made to be placed over the top of a motorcycle helmet? That’s sort of what Wright looked like.

Another comparison – courtesy of Newday’s David Lennon? The Great Gazoo.

According to Lennon, Mets, Rockies and Rockies fans all took pleasure in poking fun at Wright, looking as sharp as he was in his little league helmet. (By the way, it will be mandatory in the minor leagues next season)

Wright admitted that the helmet did need some adjustments. It had a tendency to slide down over his eyes while he was running. Wright also nearly killed Troy Tulowitzki when the giant helmet rocketed off his head at second base.

“There were times I couldn’t get it to fit,” Wright said. “I don’t know – maybe I got an odd-shaped head.”

Still, Wright plans to stick with the helmet, and there is no truth to the rumor that he will try a chinstrap when he returns to the lineup on Thursday.

For video goodness, click here.

******

If you Twitter, and only wear safe headgear while operating your computer, follow me at @Bharks.

Marlins unveil what they’re putting in the space where the home run sculpture used to be

Getty Images
4 Comments

Not long after the new ownership group bought the Miami Marlins, face of the franchise Derek Jeter made it clear that he wanted the home runs sculpture beyond the outfield fence gone. In October they announced that it would, in fact, be moving out to a plaza or the parking lot or someplace you’re unlikely to ever see it because who goes to Marlins games?

Today we got a tease of what the Marlins are doing with the space the sculpture is vacating:

It was only a matter of time before that green wall went away. There are a lot of things I like about the overall aesthetic of Marlins Park, but almost all of them are because of their novelty. Jeff Loria was bad for a lot of reasons, but one of the few good things he did was eschew nostalgia and traditionalism with the ballpark. Nostalgia and traditionalism, unfortunately, is the straw that stirs baseball’s drink, so any “weird” colors or flourishes were gonna be beat out of that place as the years went on. It was inevitable.

As for the “three-tier social space,” here’s hoping that tickets for it are cheap or the Marlins start winning ballgames soon, because the Marlins can’t really fill their existing spectator spaces now.