The Cubs need to get rid of Milton Bradley. But how?

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The Chicago Tribune’s Phil Rogers thinks that there’s only one thing to do with Milton Bradley:

My recommendation: Release him . . . As of Wednesday, when Bradley declared he roots for nine-inning games
because he can’t wait to get home, Hendry no longer can cross his
fingers and hope Bradley becomes the player he pictured he would be in
right field at Wrigley Field. He has to do something to get him off the roster, the sooner the better.

I agree with the idea of getting rid of Bradley. He’s turned into an unmitigated disaster in Chicago. I disagree, however, that the Cubs should simply release him.  Rogers’ view of this is informed by the idea that the only way to trade Bradley would be to take on one of the games’ truly bad contracts in return like Aaron Rowand or somebody’s.  Wouldn’t it be possible, however, for the Cubs to simply offer to eat a large portion of the $21 million owed to Bradley and try to get at least something in return?  Even a low level prospect is better than nothing, right?

Maybe I’m just dreaming, though.  While it looked for a few brief shining moments in 2008 that Bradley had turned the corner on his old rep and had matured, it’s possible that he has burnt so many bridges at this point that no one would want him at even the lowest of prices.

Report: Twins sign Martín Pérez to one-year deal

Martin Perez
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Ken Rosenthal of The Athletic reports that the Twins have picked up free agent left-hander Martín Pérez on a one-year deal. Financial terms of the deal have yet to be announced, but it looks like a club option is included for the 2020 season. The Twins have not officially confirmed the signing.

Pérez, 27, missed 85 days of the Rangers’ 2018 campaign after undergoing elbow surgery on his non-throwing arm. He sustained the injury partway through the 2017 offseason; as the story goes, he was charged by a bull at his ranch in Venezuela and fell on his right arm as he was trying to get out of the animal’s path. (He later killed and ate said bull.) When he finally returned to the mound, he cobbled together a 2-7 record in 15 starts with a 6.22 ERA, 3.8 BB/9, 5.5 SO/9, and career-low -0.2 fWAR through 85 1/3 innings out of the rotation and bullpen.

As they approach the start of the 2019 season, the Twins will be looking for something a little more, well, bullish from Pérez. Prior to his injury, he turned in two solid seasons with the Rangers in 2016 and 2017, nearing the 200-inning threshold in both campaigns and providing a combined value of 4.2 fWAR at a time when Texas’ starters collectively ranked sixth-worst in the league.