The Cubs need to get rid of Milton Bradley. But how?

Leave a comment

The Chicago Tribune’s Phil Rogers thinks that there’s only one thing to do with Milton Bradley:

My recommendation: Release him . . . As of Wednesday, when Bradley declared he roots for nine-inning games
because he can’t wait to get home, Hendry no longer can cross his
fingers and hope Bradley becomes the player he pictured he would be in
right field at Wrigley Field. He has to do something to get him off the roster, the sooner the better.

I agree with the idea of getting rid of Bradley. He’s turned into an unmitigated disaster in Chicago. I disagree, however, that the Cubs should simply release him.  Rogers’ view of this is informed by the idea that the only way to trade Bradley would be to take on one of the games’ truly bad contracts in return like Aaron Rowand or somebody’s.  Wouldn’t it be possible, however, for the Cubs to simply offer to eat a large portion of the $21 million owed to Bradley and try to get at least something in return?  Even a low level prospect is better than nothing, right?

Maybe I’m just dreaming, though.  While it looked for a few brief shining moments in 2008 that Bradley had turned the corner on his old rep and had matured, it’s possible that he has burnt so many bridges at this point that no one would want him at even the lowest of prices.

Behold: The new Marlins logo

Marlins
8 Comments

The Marlins have not released their new uniform design — at least not yet — but they did release their new logo today. That’s it up top. It’s not too bad? Here’s the secondary logo, which you could maybe imagine on a cap?

The logo appears at the end of the video below which is, until the final few seconds, not about baseball at all. It’s about Miami. A “this is our town” promotional thing which takes you on a tour and shows you people and the culture of the city.

A lot of times when sports teams do this stuff it seems somewhat contrived, but I think it’s pretty cool here. The Marlins have almost never sent much of a “we are a part of our community” message. Jeff Loria lived in New York for Pete’s sake and, of course, they infamously consider themselves a foreign corporation for legal purposes. Before this, the most they ever seemed to want out of Miami is tax subsidies and to be left the hell alone.

You can’t just market your way into a community — and the Marlins have a long way to go before they can earn back any sort of trust from baseball fans in Miami —  but the fact that they are at least trying to make themselves part of the Miami community is probably worth something.

Anyway: