Bruntlett's jersey is Cooperstown worthy?

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We had quite a lively debate yesterday about whether Pete Rose should be in the Hall of Fame.  I’d have to guess, however, that even the most ardent Rose haters — of which I am not one, no matter what a lot of you think — would agree that Rose has a better claim to Cooperstown immortality than Eric Bruntlett’s sweaty jersey:

There actually have been more perfect games — 18, including the postseason — than unassisted triple plays . . . That is why the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum asked Bruntlett for a piece of memorabilia from the play.

Bruntlett is sending his jersey.

This isn’t a slam on Bruntlett or his feat — I took care of that yesterday.  I just don’t get the obsessiveness on the part of the Hall for this kind of totem.  I get truly historic jerseys, and I even get more directly symbolic things like a guy’s spikes for a stolen base record or something.  But the shirt a backup second baseman was wearing when something cool yet kind of flukey happened? How isn’t preserved video or a photo sufficient?  What does the jersey actually add to the historic remembrance of it all?  Maybe the glove would be better.  Bruntlett probably doesn’t want to part with that in the middle of a season, of course, so maybe the Hall should just wait for that.

Don’t get me wrong — this is not a complaint as such. Just kind of a head scratcher regarding why it is we actually preserve artifacts like this. Is it to remember an event? Does the Hall do this out of a sense of mere inertia?

Probably worth a visit to Cooperstown to ask someone. 

Video: Ramon Torres hits little league home run in first at-bat of season

Jayne Kamin-Oncea/Getty Images
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The Royals recalled infielder Ramon Torres from Triple-A Omaha on Saturday. He didn’t get into a game until starting Thursday night’s game against the Rangers, batting ninth.

In the top of the second inning, facing Austin Bibens-Dirkx, Torres laced a single up the middle. Center fielder Delino DeShields charged in on it, attempting to keep Ryan Goins at second base, but the ball went right past his glove, through his legs, and nearly trickled all the way to the warning track. Goins scored easily and Torres was waved home, too. He managed to narrowly beat the throw, touching home plate with his left hand on a head-first slide.

The play was officially scored a single and a three-base error. Torres wasn’t credited with an RBI on the play. But at least the Royals got two runs out of it.