Potent quotables: Rice says he was 'misquoted'

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“Anybody who
reads that story knows I wasn’t talking about Jeter or Rodriguez. Look
at them. Do you see any baggy pants? Do you see any dreadlocks?”




– Hall-of-Famer Jim Rice says that just because you mention someone’s name doesn’t necessarily mean you are talking about them.



“That could be
part of it. I should have won the MVP that year, by the way. There was
a trial. I took responsibility for my participation in it. That
happened 24 years ago. And along with that, you’ve got the steroid
issue now. Baseball and the United States are supposed to be two
forgiving entities — why haven’t they forgiven me? Deal with me for
what I’ve done and for my numbers and just forgive. In ’75, my first
year as a regular (starter), people started identifying me as one of
the best players in the game, and then later on as the best player. If
the media can do that, they should be able to look at me and look at my
numbers and say, ‘This guy is a Hall-of-Famer.'”




– Speaking of the Hall of Fame, Dave Parker thinks his drug use is keeping him out.



“There were a
couple of heaters (when) I felt that I should have thrown a hook. I
step off and re-gather and that’s when the non-executed pitch came.
(Posada) calls fine back there. It’s just a matter of me throwing what
I want to throw. There’s no pattern there. I’ve had a great run now
with Jorge. So there’s no fingers to point but at me.”




– A.J. Burnett, who was visibly irritated in Saturday’s 14-1 loss to the Red Sox, denies any rift with his catcher Jorge Posada.



“Koozie’s the only guy who ever saw it. Maybe that’s Koozie’s urban myth.”



– Ron Swoboda comments on Jerry Koosman’s admission
that he was the one who rubbed the baseball on his shoe in Game 5 of
the 1969 World Series, granting Cleon Jones first base on a hit by
pitch. The Mets eventually defeated the Orioles 5-3, shocking the
baseball universe with their improbable World Series victory.

Tim Anderson on Joe West: ‘I don’t have much to say about him. Everybody knows he’s terrible.’

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During the top of the ninth inning of Saturday night’s 7-3 loss to the Cubs, White Sox shortstop Tim Anderson was ejected by umpire Joe West. Anderson attempted to complete a double play started by second baseman Yoan Moncada, but Javier Báez slid hard into Anderson at the second base bag to disrupt him. Anderson’s throw went past first baseman Matt Davidson, allowing a run to score.

White Sox manager Rick Renteria challenged the ruling on the field, but it was upheld after replay review. Anderson had a brief conversation with umpire Joe West then went back to his position. Shortly thereafter, West ejected Anderson, who became irate.

After the game, Anderson said of West, via Vinnie Duber of NBC Sports Chicago, “I asked him a question, and he kind of got pissed at me. I asked him if he saw [Báez] reach for my leg in the replay. He asked me if I was going to argue that, and I said, ‘No, I was just asking a question.’ And after that I didn’t say anything else. He started barking at me. Kept staring me down. I gave him, ‘Why you keep looking at me?’ Did that twice and threw me out.”

Anderson then said, “I don’t have much to say about him. Everybody knows he’s terrible. But I didn’t say much and he threw me out. It’s OK.” Anderson added about the play in which one can see Báez reach his arm out to interfere with Anderson, “Yeah, definitely. You could see it in the replay. That’s just one of the many that they missed in New York, I guess.”

Anderson’s criticism of West doesn’t come as a surprise. West has had a reputation as an instigator for decades. Major League Baseball almost never holds umpires accountable for their conduct on the field and some umpires, like West, take advantage of this knowledge.

It was a bittersweet ending for Anderson as he homered earlier in the game, becoming the first White Sox shortstop ever to have 20 home runs and 20 stolen bases in the same season. It’s just the sixth 20/20 season in White Sox history, joining Alex Ríos (2010, 2012), Ray Durham (2001), Magglio Ordóñez (2001), and Tommie Agee.

Anderson accounted for the only run the White Sox scored on Sunday against the Cubs with an RBI double. On the season, he’s hitting .243/.284/.412 with those 20 homers, 26 steals, 64 RBI, and 76 runs in 594 plate appearances.