Boras gets the win

Leave a comment

Jon Heyman yesterday: “Strasburg’s agent Scott Boras is said to be using Matsuzaka’s $52 million bonus as the baseline. That doesn’t mean they wouldn’t come off that number.”

At $15.1 million, I’d say they came off that number quite a bit.  After months of having that $50 million number tossed around so casually, it’s kinda surprising that Strasburg ended up signing so far below his reported demands. A lot of other people are noticing that too and are thus calling this a big win for the Nats.

But then you have to remember two things. First, you have to remember that this deal is some 50% larger than the previous record, which was Mark Prior’s.  Second, you have to remember that Boras has long been the type of guy who couldn’t be bothered with perception and P.R. and all of that — he just wants to get the money. Tell me: if someone told you that they were going to get you 50% more dough than anyone in your position ever got, wouldn’t you think you hit the jackpot? If you were told that you had to pay $50 for something and in the end, only had to pay $15, wouldn’t you think you got a bargain? 

The net result of this is that if you followed the blow-by-blow of it all, it looks like Boras got his head handed to him. If you look at just the numbers, however, it was a great victory for team Boras. He created high expectations, by doing so ended up making his client a boatload of money and, like any good con man, made his mark — the Nats — happy to fork over the dough.

I have a good friend who often notes that It’s About the Money. I tend to believe him when he says that, and in light of it, I have to declare Scott Boras the victor here.

Brewers to give Mike Moustakas a look at second base

Thearon W. Henderson/Getty Images
8 Comments

The Brewers reportedly signed third baseman Mike Moustakas to a one-year, $10 million contract on Sunday. While the deal is not yet official, MLB.com’s Adam McCalvy reports that the Brewers plan to give Moustakas a look at second base during spring training. If all goes well, he will be the primary second baseman and Travis Shaw will stay at third base.

The initial thought was that Moustakas would simply take over at third base for the more versatile Shaw. Moustakas has spent 8,035 of his career defensive innings at third base, 35 innings at first base, and none at second. In fact, he has never played second base as a pro player. Shaw, meanwhile, has spent 268 of his 4,073 1/3 defensive innings in the majors at second base and played there as recently as October.

This is certainly an interesting wrinkle to signing Moustakas, who is a decent third baseman. He was victimized by another slow free agent market, not signing until March last year on a $6.5 million deal with a $15 million mutual option for this season. That option was declined, obviously, and he ended up signing for $5 million cheaper here in February as the Brewers waited him out. Notably, Moustakas did not have qualifying offer compensation attached to him this time around.

Last season, between the Royals and Brewers, the 30-year-old Moustakas hit .251/.315/.459 with 28 home runs and 95 RBI in 635 plate appearances.