Are we still in the golden era of shortstops?

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Remember the golden era of shortstops of the late 90s and early 2000s, when the American League was ruled by Derek Jeter, Alex Rodriguez, Nomar Garciaparra and Miguel Tejada? Good times weren’t they?

But then Nomar Garciaparra became an injury magnet, A-Rod moved to third base and Miguel Tejada leveled off. What happened to it all?

Well, in an interesting post over at Baseball Analysts, Patrick Sullivan makes a case that the golden age didn’t end. In fact, it might be at its peak.

He compares the class of 2002 to this year’s class, which includes Hanley Ramirez, Jason Bartlett and Troy Tulowitzki, among others. Jeter and Tejada appear in both groups. The numbers are quite similar, so Sullivan theorizes that markets and media hype are playing a role in the current group’s lack of publicity.

A quick glance at both lists makes it pretty easy to explain why the 2009 group gets so much less publicity. The first group was still considered part of a revolutionary time in baseball, and it didn’t hurt that they were largely either in huge baseball markets or playing for the best teams in the game. A-Rod, Nomar and Jeter were referred to as the Holy Trinity, Tejada came on later but grabbed headlines for the great Oakland A’s teams of the turn of the century. Edgar Renteria played for St. Louis at the time, a great market with a large and attentive fanbase.

So which group do you think is better? And furthermore, which group is better when you consider defense?

Marlins designate Derek Dietrich for assignment

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The Marlins designated utilityman Derek Dietrich for assignment, Clark Spencer of the Miami Herald reports. This comes amid a flurry of moves on Tuesday night as teams prepare their rosters ahead of the Rule 5 draft next month.

Dietrich, 29, is coming off another strong season in which he hit .265/.330/.421 with 16 home runs, 45 RBI, and 72 runs scored in 551 plate appearances. He played all over the diamond, spending most of his time in left field and at first base. Dietrich also played some second base, third base, and right field.

Dietrich is entering his third of four years of arbitration eligibility. He earned $2.9 million this past season and MLB Trade Rumors projects him to earn $4.8 million in 2019. Cutting Dietrich represents a bit more than 4 million in savings for the rebuilding and perennially small-market Marlins. Dietrich should draw some interest, so the Marlins could end up trading him rather soon.

Wonder how J.T. Realmuto, now the longest-tenured Marlin, is feeling right about now.