The draft: is a hard slotting system around the corner?

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The KC Star’s Sam Mellinger has a post up today about the broken system of compensating draft picks in both football and baseball.  You’ve heard most of the arguments and examples before, but this part is worth remembering:

Both sports are approaching the end of their current collective bargaining agreements. This is scheduled to be the final NFL season with a salary cap, and there are significant rumblings on each side about a potential work stoppage.

Baseball’s CBA is scheduled to end after the 2011 season. Many baseball insiders on both sides of the negotiation say the players are willing to institute some sort of slotting system for draft picks, but need to get something back from owners in return.

It won’t take much in return, I’d wager.  Most people don’t realize this, but draftees aren’t union members — you don’t become eligible to join the union until you’re on a 40-man roster — yet the members have the power to negotiate the terms of the draft.  As such, giving the owners a hard slotting system doesn’t truly take anything off the union’s plate.

Sure, they don’t want to be seen as laying down to ownership so they’ll demand something in return, but make no mistake: current players aren’t fans of rapidly-escalating amateur signing bonuses, and the sorts of things they’ll likely take from ownership in exchange for a hard slotting system fall on the “better lunch meat on the postgame spread” end of the spectrum than on the end where things of real value reside.  It’s certainly not work-stoppage material.

Report: Nathan Eovaldi drawing interest from at least nine teams

Nathan Eovaldi
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Former Red Sox right-hander Nathan Eovaldi is up for grabs this offseason, and Nick Cafardo of the Boston Globe says that as many as nine suitors are interested in bringing the righty aboard. While the Red Sox are eager to retain Eovaldi’s services after his lights-out performance during their recent postseason run, they’ll have to contend with the Brewers, Phillies, Braves, White Sox, Padres, Blue Jays, Giants, and Angels — all of whom are reportedly positioned to offer something for the starter this winter.

It wasn’t all smooth sailing for the 28-year-old in 2018, however. After losing his 2017 season to Tommy John surgery, he underwent an additional procedure to remove loose bodies from his right elbow in March and didn’t make his first appearance until the end of May. He was flipped for lefty reliever Jalen Beeks just prior to the trade deadline and finished his season with a combined 6-7 record in 21 starts, a 3.81 ERA, 1.6 BB/9, and 8.2 SO/9 through 111 innings.

Despite his numerous health issues over the last few years, Eovaldi raised his stock in October after becoming a major contributor during the Red Sox’ championship run. He contributed two quality starts in the ALDS and ALCS and returned in Games 1-3 of the World Series with three lights-out performances in relief — including a six-inning effort in the 18-inning marathon that was Game 3.

A frontrunner has yet to emerge for the righty this offseason, but Cafardo points out that the nine teams listed so far might just be the tip of the iceberg. Still, he won’t be the most sought-after starter on the market, as former Diamondbacks southpaw Patrick Corbin is expected to command an even bigger payday following his career-best 6.0-fWAR performance in 2018.