Trade that should happen: Mets get Snyder

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Mets get: Chris Snyder

Diamondbacks get: Nick Evans and Eddie Kunz

Why it should happen:

While Snyder has been sidelined with a lower back strain, Miguel
Montero has been a house-of-fire, batting .380 with five homers and 14
RBI in July. He’s been so good that Snyder may be relegated to a bench role when he returns from the disabled list later this week.

“Snydes is still rehabbing so I still
have a few days to mull over what I’m going to do, said manager A.J.
Hinch. “But he’s (Montero) certainly staked his claim to significant
playing time.”

Snyder, 28, just signed a contract extension with the Diamondbacks over
the winter. He’s owed a little less than $1.5 million for the rest of
2009, $4.75 million in 2010 and $5.75 million in 2011. His contract
includes a club option in 2012 for $6.75 million, with a $750,000
buyout.

Meanwhile, Brian Schneider is in the last year of his deal with the
Mets. The Mets have no real major-league ready catchers in their
system, as Josh Thole, while batting .337/.405/.441 with Double-A
Binghamton, is still fine-tuning his skills as a backstop. There isn’t
much hope among impending free agents (Bengie Molina, Ramon Hernandez,
etc.).

Snyder would give the Mets a young catcher with fine defensive
skills (he has thrown out 32.7% of would-be basestealers in his career
and managed a perfect fielding percentage in 2008), who projects as a
20-homer guy from the right side of the plate with a full season of
at-bats (.737 career OPS).

As for the Diamondbacks, they would get a 21-year-old power bat who
has crushed lefties to the tune of a .919 OPS in the minors. He could
contribute at first base or the outfield as soon as this season.
Meanwhile, Kunz is a supreme groundball pitcher (67.4% in the minors),
who can ably step in if the Diamondbacks decide to trade Jon Rauch
and/or Chad Qualls. Considering how much Snyder is being paid, the Mets
might not even have to give up this much.

Will it happen?

Probably not before the deadline, but Snyder is sure to be dealt before next season.

Alex Bregman shows how easy it is to manufacture “controversy” in baseball

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In most sports it takes legitimate trash talk to create off-day “controversy.” In baseball, it takes the weakest sauce. We saw how weak that sauce was yesterday.

Alex Bregman and the Houston Astros are going to face off against Nate Eovaldi and the Boston Red Sox in Game 3 of the ALCS tonight. It’s worth noting that earlier this season, they hit back-to-back-to-back home runs off of Eovaldi when he was pitching for the Tampa Bay Rays.

Yesterday, in an act which was likely somewhat inspired by self-motivation, somewhat inspired by getting in Eovaldi’s head and somewhat inspired by a simple interest in having fun, Bregman took the video of those back-to-back-to-back homers off of Eovaldi and posted it to his Instagram:

Of course, since this is baseball, where even farting off-key can be construed as “showing up” the opposition or somehow disrespecting the game, it became a thing. Or at least people tried to make it become a thing.

Indeed, it took them a bit to find someone who would help them make it a thing, because Eovaldi himself didn’t care about it a bit, nor did Astros manager A.J. Hinch or Red Sox manager Alex Cora. Eventually, however, they hit pay dirt. Here’s Sox infielder Steve Pearce talking to WEEI.com:

“Wow. I don’t know why he would do that. We do our talking on the field. If he wants to run his mouth now we’ll see who is talking at the end of the series.”

My guess is that almost no one on the planet, Steve Pearce included, would care about this in a vacuum or if they allowed themselves to think through it for more than a second. Baseball culture, though — and let’s be clear about it, baseball media culture — has conditioned most of its players and participants to think that stuff like this is supposed to be controversial, so it actually takes effort not to start dancing to this kind of tune on auto-pilot.

Kudos to Hinch, Cora and Eolvaldi for exerting that effort and not dancing to it. To the press that automatically sought out comment on this and Pearce who dutifully gave it: hey, I get it. It’s hard to resist one’s conditioning. Maybe you’ll be able to resist it next time.