The L.A. Times really wants you to hate Manny Ramirez

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You may not have noticed this given how little coverage it has gotten, but Manny Ramirez is coming back tonight. If you think that means that the media’s hand-wringing and sanctimony about all of this is about to end, well, you’re just not familiar with the media’s work:

I’ve never asked Dodger fans for a favor before, but I have one
request now: When that first home game comes on July 16, for one night,
one at-bat or at least one swing, boo Manny. I’m not asking you to burn
your coveted Man-wig, hide the name on the back of your No. 99 T-shirt
under duct tape or torture yourself by watching Angels games. All I ask
is that if you attend Manny’s first home game, you boo. Once, at least
. . . Dodgers fans should boo Manny for one at-bat to make sure he
knows his actions were unacceptable . . . They need to say to Manny,
“We’re the ones who pay to watch you, and we demand better.”

There are a lot of reasons why newspapers like the Los Angles Times are
dying. Most of them are financial. Let us not discount the notion,
however, that their insistence of treating both their readers and the
subjects they cover like children who are incapable of forming opinions
on their own has a little to do with it too.

Has it not yet, at this late date, after all that has happened,
occurred to the L.A. Times that people like Manny Ramirez and are
willing, no, eager, to overlook his steroid suspension to watch him
play baseball?

UPDATE: It’s important to note that not everyone at
the L.A. Times feels this way. Jon Weisman of the wonderful Dodger
Thoughts blog has consistently delivered the win when it comes to Manny
Ramirez coverage, and his latest entry is no exception.
Note to whoever runs the Times’ sports section: Lead with Weisman and
relegate everyone else to sidebar links with six-point fonts.

Nationals promote 19-year-old prospect Juan Soto

SportsLogos.net
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The Nationals recalled 19-year-old outfield prospect Juan Soto from Double-A Harrisburg on Sunday, per a team announcement. Soto is poised to become the youngest player in the league once he makes his official debut with the club, and the Nationals’ first teenager to enter the majors since Bryce Harper made his first appearance back in 2012.

Entering the 2018 season, Soto was ranked no. 2 in the Nationals’ system and 15th overall. He’s certainly lived up to the hype during his first two years of pro ball, blazing through Single-A, High-A and Double-A levels in 2018 alone. While he logged just eight games at the Double-A level prior to his promotion to the majors, he proved consistent across all three levels this spring and slashed a cumulative .362/.462/.757 with 14 home runs and a 1.218 OPS in 182 plate appearances.

It’s not entirely clear how soon or in what capacity the Nationals will utilize their youngest player, but Soto’s tear through the minors is sure to pave the road for a few opportunities on the big-league level. He’ll be available off the bench for Sunday’s series finale against the Dodgers.