The Indians are on their way to 100 losses

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The Cleveland Plain Dealer’s Starting Blocks blog notes that, if the
Indians lose tonight, they will have exactly 50 losses at the exact
halfway point of the season. Starting Blocks uses that possibility as a
springboard for discussing the Indians’ previous 100-loss teams. Lots of fun stuff in there:

1971, 60-102

Nobody wanted to see this team. The Indians drew 22,036 fans to
their last eight games at old Cleveland Municipal Stadium, an average
of 2,755. In their final three road games, at Washington against the
Senators, a total of 4,512 crazies showed up – an average of 1,504. The
Senators moved after the season to Texas, where they remain as the
Rangers.

I don’t know about you, but I was rather shocked that there were only six Indians teams on that list.

In other news — in what I’m sure is a complete and total coincidence — The Plain Dealer’s Paul Hoynes speculates whether Eric Wedge, Cliff Lee and Victor Martinez will finish the season in Whaoo caps.

I think they should consider unloading in all three, but if they do, that 1971 attendance “record” may be in jeopardy.

21-year-old Gleyber Torres homers twice off of 44-year-old Bartolo Colon

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Yankees second baseman Gleyber Torres was born on December 13, 1996. That year, Bartolo Colon (who turns 45 years old on Thursday) was wrapping up a season he spent with Double-A Canton-Akron and Triple-A Buffalo. He would debut in the majors the following April.

In a clash of generations, the 21-year-old Torres and Colon squared off on Monday as the Yankees visited the Rangers. Torres won the battle twice, drilling a two-run home run off of Colon in the second inning and a solo shot off of Colon in the fourth. Colon wound up giving up six runs in total on eight hits (including four homers) and a walk with four strikeouts in 5 1/3 innings.

Here is video of the first homer Torres hit:

Torres is the second-youngest Yankee in club history with a multi-homer game. Mickey Mantle was 20 years and 296 days old when he went yard twice on August 11, 1952. Torres is 21 years, 159 days old. Joe DiMaggio was 21-212 when he hit two on June 24, 1936.

So much for respecting one’s elders. We’re currently seeing a youth movement in baseball. 19-year-old Juan Soto hit his first major league homer on Monday against the Padres. 20-year-olds Ronald Acuña and Mike Soroka debuted for the Braves earlier this year. Could 19-year-old Blue Jays prospect Vladimir Guerrero, Jr. join them soon?