Link-O-Rama: Beltre undergoes shoulder surgery

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* As expected, Adrian Beltre will undergo shoulder surgery today and MLB.com reports
that the best-case scenario has him returning in mid-August. Seattle
will miss Beltre’s outstanding glove and may choose to further weaken
their defense in the hopes of helping the league’s worst offense by
shifting Russell Branyan to third base while using prospect Mike Carp
at first base.

* Despite hitting just .250/.298/.303 with poor defense Emilio
Bonifacio still has people defending his play via cliches and
platitudes, as Juan C. Rodriguez of the Florida Sun-Sentinel writes stuff like
“he’s shown no signs of being a ‘me’ player.” My guess is that there
aren’t many 24-year-olds posting a .601 OPS in their first full season
who qualify as “me” players.

* Both the San Francisco Chronicle and Chicago Tribune report that the Giants are interested in Jermaine Dye, but as Dye himself notes the White Sox probably aren’t in sell mode right now after finally climbing back to .500 with yesterday’s win.

* In a recent Sports Illustrated poll Lou Piniella was named
the manager players would least like to play for. And the amazing thing
is that Milton Bradley wasn’t even eligible to vote for him.

Twins to retire Joe Mauer’s No. 7

AP Photo/Jim Mone
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Twins senior director of communications Dustin Morse announced that the Twins will honor former C/1B Joe Mauer by retiring his uniform number 7. Mauer announced his retirement from baseball on November 9.

Mauer will join Harmon Killebrew (No. 3), Tony Oliva (No. 6), Tom Kelly (No. 10), Kent Hrbek (No. 14), Rod Carew (No. 29), Kirby Pucket (No. 34), and Bert Blyleven (No. 28) as Twins to have their numbers retired.

Mauer, 35, spent 15 seasons in the majors, all with the Twins. He posted a career .306/.388/.439 triple-slash line with 143 home runs and 923 RBI. He won the AL MVP Award in 2009, won the batting title three times, earned three Gold Gloves and five Silver Sluggers, and made the AL All-Star team six times. Sadly, his career was limited due to injuries, including a concussion that caused him to move from catcher to first base.

Five years from now, Mauer will appear on the Hall of Fame ballot. There will certainly be some arguments for and against his candidacy. He retired with 55.1 career Wins Above Replacement, according to Baseball Reference, which definitely puts him in the conversation. But, as always, there’s never a consensus.